Quantcast
I need your Italian Grandma's Marinara Sauce Recipe
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31

Thread: I need your Italian Grandma's Marinara Sauce Recipe

  1. #1
    Senior Member Shinob1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    284

    I need your Italian Grandma's Marinara Sauce Recipe

    So this weekend I want to try to endeavor on a new culinary adventure, Marinara Sauce.

    My wife is a picky eater and Ravioli is one of her favorites. I don't have a way to make them by scratch, so I thought the next best thing was to make the sauce. I need a solid basic recipe that I can try this weekend.

    Help?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    WildBoar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    NoVa
    Posts
    2,129
    Okay, my 100% Italian grandmother's sauce was pretty good. Made from canned tomatoes, and mainly flavored w/ sausages and dried herbs/ powders. But my 100% Hungarian grandmother made better sauce, as it was also flavored w/ pork ribs :-) BUT, I'm afraid to say I have been able to improve upon their sauces a bit by adding some onion or mirepoix (sp?), fresh garlic, wine, etc.

    Here is the basic sauce recipe they both used (and that I grew up making as taught by my mother):

    - Brown sausages and meatballs in a heavy pot (7 quart size is good) and remove, leaving some of the oil/ fat.
    - Add ~4 quarts of canned tomato puree (canned by relatives). If you do not have access to something like this, use cans of whole peeled tomatoes pureed in a blender.
    - Add a tablespoon or so of tomato paste.
    - Add 1-2 teaspoons of salt.
    - Add dried oregano, parsley and basil (~ 1 tablespoon each).
    - Add garlic powder and onion powder (~ 1 teaspoon each).
    - Once simmering, add the sausages and meatballs back in (and ribs, if you got 'em!).
    - Simmer the f**k out of it, for at least 3 hours. Skim off fat if excessive (I prefer to stir it back in ) This simmering is mainly to thicken the sauce.
    - Let it sit until the next day. You did start this on Saturday, didn't you???
    - Bring it back to a boil and lower to a simmer for another hour or so before serving.

    Please bear in mind their recipes were developed at a time when it was difficult getting the fresh ingredients we take for granted today. Think 1940s, war-time... But it stuck with them, and was passed down to the next generation. Here is my typical sauce:

    - Brown sausages and meatballs in a heavy pot (7 quart size is good) and remove, leaving some of the oil/ fat.
    - Saute a diced onion, or go all-out with a mirepoix, using a fine dice for the carrots, onions and celery. I tend to go with ~1/2 cup onion and 1/4 cup each carrots and celery.
    - **Optional** Near the end of the saute, add in ~1-1/2 tablespoons of tomato paste and get it carmalizing a little bit.
    - Near the end of the saute add in a few cloves of minced garlic and 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of red pepper flakes. Let cook for ~30 seconds, being careful not to let the garlic or pepper flakes burn.
    - Add ~4 quarts of canned tomato puree (canned by relatives). If you do not have access to something like this, use cans of whole peeled tomatoes pureed in a blender.
    - Add 1-2 teaspoons of salt.
    - Add dried oregano, parsley and basil (~ 1 tablespoon each). Can also go for fresh instead; if so, save them for the last half hour of cooking.
    - Once simmering, add the sausages and meatballs back in (and ribs, if you got 'em!).
    - Simmer the f**k out of it, for at least 3 hours. Skim off fat if excessive (I prefer to stir it back in ) This simmering is mainly to thicken the sauce.
    - Let it sit until the next day. You did start this on Saturday, didn't you???
    - Bring it back to a boil and lower to a simmer for another hour or so before serving. Add in ~3/4 cup of red wine for the last half hour of cooking.

    Both versions produce a pretty heavy sauce that is very flavorful (thanks to the pork products). It may be a bit too much for some lighter pastas, although it's the only kind of pasta sauce I knew for the first 20 years of my life so I did not know any better
    __________
    David (WildBoar's Kitchen)

  3. #3
    Senior Member Shinob1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    284

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    WildBoar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    NoVa
    Posts
    2,129
    haha, thanks. BTW, don't forget the "taste/ season/ taste/ reseason", as our tastes likely vary, and I'm guestimating on some of it. But a little more or less dried parsely is not going to make or break things. Also, I just did a quick edit to add in dried basil, plus a note about being able to go with fresh herbs if you defer until the last ~30 minutes of cooking.
    __________
    David (WildBoar's Kitchen)

  5. #5
    I would suggest searching "Marcella Hazan tomato sauce" on google. It's a really awesome and easy sauce.

  6. #6
    Senior Member

    SpikeC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    3,773
    I do Marcella's Bolognese evey now and again, it is quite good! I do substitute pork for the beef, tho......
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    WildBoar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    NoVa
    Posts
    2,129
    C'mon now, he asked for marinara recipes, not bolognese! If you want to pull out the meat sauce recipes, I'm gonna have to trump w/ a recipe or two for cinghiale ragu
    __________
    David (WildBoar's Kitchen)

  8. #8

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Top of Georgia
    Posts
    1,218
    Quote Originally Posted by WildBoar View Post

    <snip>

    Please bear in mind their recipes were developed at a time when it was difficult getting the fresh ingredients we take for granted today. Think 1940s, war-time... But it stuck with them, and was passed down to the next generation.

    <snip>
    I've actually been working diligently over the years trying my best to work without fresh ingredients. Fresh herbs are almost non-existent at my grocery, except maybe parsley and sometimes cilantro. We do have those $5 packs with 3 sprigs of fresh rosemary and such, but they are often browned and wilted and not worth the added cost. So I use a lot of dried herbs.

    -AJ

  9. #9
    Senior Member AFKitchenknivesguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,044
    AJ,

    Why don't you go to home depot and buy plants there? If it's a one and go, it's probably cheaper than the supermarket (and fresher), but you could also grow your own garden with minimal work/space, especially in a warm humid climate like Georgia.
    Jason

  10. #10

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Top of Georgia
    Posts
    1,218
    I have, but my thumb is not very green it seems.

    -AJ

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •