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Thread: The Butcher post

  1. #21
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    A place i worked at use to buy cows from the 4-H club the kids would auction off there live stock .

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    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  2. #22
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    The sprawling Swift meatpacking plant sits abandonded at 400 E. Exchange Ave, alongside the Armour Company plant on the east side of the Fort Worth Stockyards. Opened in 1903, it once represented the economic boom times of Fort Worth.

    It was major news in 1901 when Armour and Swift, America's two largest meatpacking companies, agreed to build regional plants in the Stockyards. Construction began in 1902, and by 1909, the plants were processing 1.2 million cattle and 870,000 hogs per year as well as sheep, horses and mules. By 1910, the Stockyards were the nation's third-largest livestock market, behind Chicago and Kansas City, Missouri, employing most of what was then north Fort Worth. People came from all over the world to work here,

    The Stockyards hit its heyday during World War II, but the rise of the trucking industry after the war spelled the demise of railroad-centered packing plants. Armour closed its plant in 1962; Swift lasted until 1971.

    Since then, the abandoned proerty has been host to an Old Spaghetti Warehouse restaurant and the filming location for the television programs, "Prison Break" and Chuck Norris’ "Walker Texas Ranger". Today, it is a fabulous multi-hued palette of graffiti some of it reflected beautifully. Urban decay at its finest

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    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  3. #23
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    my father worked one summer for Armour meat comp as a sticker, he would walk down the line and slit their throats the blood would be collected and sent off for whatever they used it four. He said he worked with 4 very large African American guys and every time he would be near them they would grab a coffee cup and hold it out to catch the blood and then drink it down while it was still hot. One day they brought him his own cup and waited to see what the Indian kid would do. He filled the cup and chugged it down, no problems. He got respect then and nobody bothered him any more. He said the blood wasn't the disgusting part. The disgusting part was that the guys hung their cups on a fly ridden board and never rinsed them out. He said that some of the cups had so much old caked blood in them that they only held a tablespoon or so. He said that is what made him gag more then anything else.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  4. #24
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    Gustavus Franklin Swift founded a meat-packing empire in the Midwest during the late 19th century, over which he presided until his death. He is credited with the development of the first practical ice-cooled railroad car which allowed his company to ship dressed meats to all parts of the country and even abroad, which ushered in the "era of cheap beef." Swift pioneered the use of animal by-products for the manufacture of soap, glue, fertilizer, various types of sundries, and even medical products

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    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  5. #25
    Do any other KF members besides myself work as butchers? Actual, full animal butchers? (you'd be surprised by the amount of "butchers" who actually aren't)

  6. #26
    Senior Member VoodooMajik's Avatar
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    Awsome post! I'm going to Banff to learn to work with Caribou. Would rather work with the whole animal, but can't have everything
    It's not the Answer it's the Experience

  7. #27
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    El Pescador's Avatar
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    did you work for Tiptop?

    Quote Originally Posted by steeley View Post
    A place i worked at use to buy cows from the 4-H club the kids would auction off there live stock .

    [IMG][/IMG]

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    I like to imagine that all my knives are made by a person wearing a hat like this.

    k.
    Yeah I gotta get a top hat. Thats just a whole different level of looking like a boss.

    BTW: THANKS for making this thread! I love history. Black and white pics make my day!
    Am I the only one who searched for The Edge from U2 and ended up here?

  9. #29
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    I've heard of Tip Top meats but my bringing in 4H stock was in Wyoming.
    We had a full butcher shop .
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  10. #30
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    I have been looking through old books and found this one .

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    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

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