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  1. #1
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    The Butcher post

    An ancient trade, whose duties may date back to the domestication of livestock, butchers formed guilds in England as far back as 1272.[3] Today, many jurisdictions offer trade certifications for butchers. Some areas expect a three-year apprenticeship followed by the option of becoming a master butcher.

    [IMG][/IMG]1560

    [IMG][/IMG] 1854

    [IMG][/IMG] 1875
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

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    1885 [IMG][/IMG]

    1901

    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  3. #3
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    1945
    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

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    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]

    look at the cleaver on the bench.
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  5. #5
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    french he is doing it right.
    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  6. #6
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    my kind of girl.
    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]

    and pie for everyone.
    [IMG][/IMG]

    notice the tin cooker in front .
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  7. #7
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    Tin cooker
    [IMG][/IMG]
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  8. #8
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    Thans for doing this! I love seeing all the old pics, and hope more vendors get back to the old ways. It's hard to find stores around here that will cut meat for you; most arrives already cut up, and only with certain parts/ pieces.
    __________
    David (WildBoar's Kitchen)

  9. #9


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    M F Mullins - Champion Beef Dresser of the World

    Awhile ago my friend Jim (our Admin) sent me this picture that he came across on the internet. He told me to Google the man's name shown and read his story.

    FULL Size Image - CLICK HERE



    I was fascinated with the story as well as how eerily similar his appearance is to our Chef Niloc (Colin).

    I forwarded the picture to Colin who couldn't deny the similarities and responded that he was going to grow that same mustache. Funny thing is that those of us who know Colin can see even more similarities than just the look they share.

    I thought that maybe you guys/gals might be interested in hearing the story of M.F. Mullins, "The Champion Beef Dresser of the World".

    Thanks to Jim for sharing this with me.



    The King of Butchers.



    I here present to the reader the biography and record of the great
    butcher champion, M. F. Mullins, of Chicago. Mr. Mullins was born in
    Canandaigua, N. Y., in 1863. He moved west with his parents in 1869,
    settling in Hammond, Lake county, Indiana. At the age of 18 years Mr.
    Mullins started out in life for himself, and chose for his vocation the
    butcher business. He commenced his apprenticeship with the firm of
    Swift & Co., when their cattle business did not exceed sixty head per day.
    He has been in the service of this company continuously since, and has
    seen the business increase to the present capacity of 7,000 head per day.
    After eight years service with the company he was promoted to the posi-
    tion of foreman, which he has held.tc- the present day. His first contest
    took place in the Exposition building in Chicago, Illinois, August 22d,
    1883, there being eight contestants for prizes, as follows: First prize, gold
    medal, valued at $250: second prize, $100; third prize, $50. The contest-
    ants worked their bullocks in the following order:

    Min. Sec.
    Walter Dennis, Bridgeport, 111. 7 39

    William Rader, Bridgeport, 111. 7 54

    Michael Sheck, Armour & Co., Chicago, 6 12

    M. F. Mullins, Swift & Co., Chicago, 4 5

    Pete Magee, Bridgeport, 111. 8 40

    Rod Laverty, Boston, Mass. 3 38

    Frank Noonan, Armour & Co. 8 40

    Joe Malone, Bridgeport, 111. 12 22



    This contest was principally considered on the best time made; good
    work was not regarded. Rod Laverty lost first prize by a foul claimed
    for not skinning out one hind leg. Mr. Mullins was awarded first prize,



    UNION STOCK YARDS AND SLAUGHTER HOUSES. 13

    Rod Laverty second, and Michael Sheck third. This contest was before
    an audience of about three thousand people.

    . This mode of contest has been discontinued, owing to the unsatis-
    factory work done. It is now supplanted by contests under American
    rules, which are as follows:

    1. There shall be three judges, who shall be considered fairminded
    and honorable men, and thoroughly acquainted with the business.

    2. Cattle shall weigh not less than 1,400 pounds.

    3. Contestants will be allowed eight minutes to dress the bullock;
    judges to call time when the bullock is drawn up, front feet off and right
    hindleg broken; dresser to call time when finished.

    4. After dresser calls time he will not be allowed near carcass or
    hide until after judges have made their inspection when, by having every-
    thing perfect, dresser will be credited with 100 points in time of eight
    minutes; points to be considered as follows:



    1st. For opening, reining and siding bullock, 15 points.

    2d. " leging, 5 points.

    3d. " rumping and backing 15 points.

    4th. " splitting, 15 points.

    5th. " clearing shank and dropping hide, 10 points.

    6th. " time, 20 points.

    7th. " general neatness. 10 points.

    8th. ' condition of hide, 10 points.



    This constitutes the 100 points to credit. The following points will be
    deducted for the following defects: Twenty points off for every minute
    over the allotted eight minutes, and ten points in his favor for every minute
    less than allotted time. Under these rules Mr. Mullins's second match
    took place October 19,1887, at the Exposition building in Chicago. 111.,
    with the exception that twenty-five minutes instead of eight were allowed
    to dress the bullock. There were nine contestants in this match. The
    judges were men of good standing and judgment and decided to the sat-
    isfaction of contestants and audience. One of them was from Boston,
    one from New York and one from Chicago.



    14 A TRIP THROUGH THE

    Min. Sec. Points.

    Mr. Mullins won first prize, $100, 10 97

    Larry Noonan won second, $50, 12 94

    Joe Smith won third. $25, 11 45 81



    At this contest there were over 3,000 people. These American rules
    which governed this contest as well as all others since bring out a better
    class of workmen, who find it to their advantage to do good work, be-
    sides being swift.

    Mr. Mullins's third match took place in the Exposition building, Chi-
    cago, 111., October I5th, 1889, before an audience of 8,000 people. Mr.
    Mullins worked his bullock last, and after the decision was given by the
    judges, there was great shouting by Mr. Mullins's admirers. Three cheers-
    were then given for the champion beef dresser of the world, Mr. M. F.
    Mullins. After the excitement had quieted down Mr. Mullins thanked
    the judges and audience in a neat little speech, also his coworkers. Then
    Mr. G. F. Swift walked up to the judges's stand and presented Mr. Mul- .
    lins with a handsome roll of bills. He was closely followed by Mr. E. C.
    Swift, of Boston, who also gave Mr. Mullins another roll of bills in ad-
    miration of his skill and activity as a beef dresser, and for so nobly rep-
    resenting their firm in the contest. The prizes were as follows:



    Min. Sec. Points.

    First prize, $300, Mr. M. F. Mullins, 8 50 119
    Second " $200, Mr. J. Smith, 10 116

    Third " $100, Mr. Larry Noonan, 9 50 104

    Mr. Mullins's fourth contest took place in Union Park, San Fran-
    cisco, Cal., May i8th, 1890, before an audience of 12,000 people, for
    $1,000. This contest was between Mr. Mullins and Mr. Westphall, of
    San Francisco, who was champion of the Pacific slope. The match was
    under the same rules as the two preceding contests, excepting that con-
    testants were allowed but eight minutes to dress the bullock instead of
    twenty-five. In the toss for choice of bullocks Mr. Westphall won, and
    in the toss for working last Mr. Mullins won. The time was as follows:.

    Mr. Westphall, 6 minutes, 42 seconds, making 85 points
    Mr. Mullins, 7 " 7 " 127 "



    UNION STOCK YARDS AND SLAUGHTER HOUSES. 15

    After the judges had inspected the bullocks it was found that Mr.
    Westphall had done very poor splitting and siding and had scored the
    hide greatly, for which he lost several points. Four proprietors of the
    largest tanneries in San Francisco inspected Mr. Mullins's hide and pro-
    nounced it as being the best work done on any hide ever taken off in the
    country. Mr. Mullins was then declared winner and the champion of the
    world, being presented with a fine gold medal.

    Mr. Mullins's fifth and last match took place at Willow Springs,
    -Chicago, July 26th, 1890, under the auspices qf the County Commission-
    ers of Cook County, Illinois, in honor of Governor Palmer, who was at
    that time a candidate for the United States Senate, and has since been
    -elected. This contest was between Mr. Westphall and Mr. Mullins.
    Mr. Westphall still thought he could beat Mr. Mullins and win back
    some of the money lost in the previous contest, as well as the champion-
    ship honors. The audience numbered 15,000 people. In this race Mr.
    Westphall got choice of bullocks again and worked first. Time as fol-
    lows:



    Mr. Westphall 6 minutes, 43 seconds, scored 107 points.
    Mr. Mullins 5 minutes, 42 seconds, scored 121 points.



    SCORE CARD OF THIS RACE:

    Opening, reining and siding 15

    Working of legs 5

    Rumping and backing 15

    Splitting 15
    Dropping hides, clearing shanks 10

    Condition of hide 10

    General neatness 10

    Time 20

    Fast time, 10 points gained per minute

    Slow time, 20 points lost per minute



    Mullins. Westphall.
    12 12



    5
    '5

    *5

    10

    IO
    10

    20
    24



    5
    14

    12
    IO
    IO
    IO
    20
    14



    Total points



    121



    107



    16 A TRIP THROUGH THE

    In this as in all other cases, all was excitement when the decision
    was made. Mr. Westphall made an eloquent speech declaring that Mr.
    Mullins was his superior, and that he had had a fair and square match
    both in San Francisco and Chicago. He also added that he was confi-
    dent there was not a man in this country who could beat Mr. Mullins in
    a beef dressing contest. Mr. Mullins was then presented with a fine gold
    watch by the four County Commissioners, valued at $250, and Mr. West-
    phall was presented with $200 in cash as a token of sincere regard for
    his good work, he being the only man who gave Mr. Mullins a close
    fight.



    If you'd like to read more on the details of how the Union Stockyards operated in the 19th century you can check out http://www.archive.org/stream/tript... which is where I obtained the above information on M.F. Mullins. There's some very interesting reading there for sure.

  10. #10
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing that Dave .
    the stock yards.
    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

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