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  1. #1

    Nagura Stone alternative

    I'll try not to make this too long but I am sick and tired of ordering online. I know there are times that its unavoidable but man!!!!!!!!!. As a professional photographer, I now have to buy all my equipment online as all the camera shops have died a death because of places like best buy and amazon. I don't want to go down the same road with my culinary equipment so I am left with Sur La table and Williams Sonoma unless I want to drive 120 miles for something. I am picking up a 1000/6000 stone today but no one has a nagura stone so I was wondering if there was an alternative I could use from say a gardening center . By the way, I am ordering from Jon @ Japanese Knife Imports but that is because I cant find anyone here who sells them.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Sandpaper is an alternative. Something like P600 wet/dry.

  3. #3
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    Why do you want a nagura?

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    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    a small diamond plate is much better than a nagura for building mud, in my opinion.

  5. #5
    I thought that is what you need to keep the stone flat? any alternatives that I can find local would be fine.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveRossy View Post
    I thought that is what you need to keep the stone flat? any alternatives that I can find local would be fine.
    Dave,

    A nagura is used to raise some "mud" on a stone, specifically a natural stone, or to clean a stone of embedded swarf during sharpening. It's not used to flatten a stone. For that, a diamond plate, like a DMT XXC or Atoma 140 is the most recommended method. You can also use 80 or 120 grit wet/dry sandpaper or drywall screen on a flat surface like a piece of heavy glass, a floor tile or a granite surface plate. The least popular method, although it will work, is one of the many coarse stones sold for that purpose, but these must be flattened themselves over time.

    Hope this helped.

    Rick

  7. #7
    Oops as you can see, I am very new to this. I just gave my Global Nakiri a 1000 & 6000 going over. I did buy some guides to help me and the difference was amazing the only problem I had was feeling the burr but I'm sure the more I practice, the better I will get.Thanks everyone.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Both raising a burr and eliminating it are known to be a little hard with Globals.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveRossy View Post
    Oops as you can see, I am very new to this. I just gave my Global Nakiri a 1000 & 6000 going over. I did buy some guides to help me and the difference was amazing the only problem I had was feeling the burr but I'm sure the more I practice, the better I will get.Thanks everyone.
    Dave,

    Everyone here started out at the same level of experience and learned from others. Don't hesitate to ask questions.

    Burrs at the 1000 grit level are hard to feel, and are almost impossible to detect (at least for me) at the 6000 grit level.

    You are absolutely correct that you will get better with practice. If you've not tried it, the magic marker "trick" is very useful to make sure you are hitting the edge.

    Rick

  10. #10
    magic marker trick

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