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Thread: Charcuterie

  1. #31
    Pink salt is worth adding to recipes like corned beef and bacon simply for the fact it helps keep the meat pinkish/reddish and not drab gray.

    Salmon is super simple; 2 to 1 ratio of kosher salt to sugar plus whatever herbs, spices, etc you prefer. At work we do citrus (zest and juice of 2 each lemon, lime and orange for 1 side of salmon) and coriander. But whatever will work: dill, garlic, pepper, etc. Make enough cure to completely surround your piece of skinned salmon. A container slightly larger than the fish is best so you don't need too much cure to keep the salmon covered in cure at all time. A large ziploc also works. Leave it like that for 24-48 hours, depending on how thick your salmon is and how "rare" you like it. Rinse, pat dry, slice thin, enjoy.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  2. #32
    Senior Member tkern's Avatar
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    Pink salt (instacure #1) helps with color but it does a lot with short term curing (2-4weeks). Long term curing, 4-whatever weeks, instacure #2 works great. Sodium nitrite (not nitrate) is the only thing that some use that doesn't really do a lot with flavor but more with color. It does do some protection against the bad bacteria but not enough (for me) to balance out the random cancer causing factor.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Thank you again for all the helpful comments.

  4. #34

    A few pointers

    This is a great website. Quite old-school, but a lot of good science here too.

    From http://www.wedlinydomowe.com/sausage-making/curing:

    Cure #1 (also known as Instacure #1, Prague Powder #1 or Pink Cure #1)
    For any aspiring sausage maker it is a necessity to understand and know how to apply Cure #1 and Cure #2, as those two cures are used worldwide though under different names and with different proportions of nitrates and salt. Cure #1 is a mixture of 1 oz of sodium nitrite (6.25%) to 1 lb of salt. It must be used to cure all meats that will require smoking at low temperatures. It may be used to cure meats for fresh sausages (optional).

    Cure #2 (also known as Instacure #2, Prague Powder #2 or Pink Cure #2)
    Cure #2 is a mixture of 1 oz of sodium nitrite (6.25%) along with 0.64 oz of sodium Nitrate (4%) to 1 lb of salt. It can be compared to the time-releasing capsules used for treating colds. It must be used with any products that do not require cooking, smoking or refrigeration and is mainly used for products that will be air cured for a long time like country ham, salami, pepperoni, and other dry sausages. Both Cure #1 and Cure #2 contain a small amount of FDA approved red coloring agent that gives them a slight pink color thus eliminating any possible confusion with common salt and that is why they are sometimes called “pink“ curing salts. Cure #1 is not interchangeable with Cure #2 and vice versa.

    Basically, it depends on your curing temperature (under 34* or over), and the length of time you intend to cure.

    And there hasn't been conclusive research on the link of either to cancer. There was a study done with lab rats in the 80s where they fed them the sodium nitrite and nitrate equivalents of 100lbs of bacon a day, and what do you know, they got cancer. That said, industrial producers of cured meats over-utilize nitrates/nitrites and phosphates (which allow the meat to open its cell structure to take on more water) in an attempt for higher turnaround. So I'm not a big fan of industrially cured items.



    Quote Originally Posted by tkern View Post
    Pink salt (instacure #1) helps with color but it does a lot with short term curing (2-4weeks). Long term curing, 4-whatever weeks, instacure #2 works great. Sodium nitrite (not nitrate) is the only thing that some use that doesn't really do a lot with flavor but more with color. It does do some protection against the bad bacteria but not enough (for me) to balance out the random cancer causing factor.

  5. #35
    Didn't want any of that to come across as combative at all. Have fun curing!

    Davis

  6. #36
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWells View Post
    Didn't want any of that to come across as combative at all. Have fun curing!

    Davis
    Welcome to the forum.
    Thanks for the link. Always open to learning more.

  7. #37
    Thanks for the welcome, glad to be here. I've been lurking for a few months, but have only posted a few times.

    As for my credentials, I have been working in kitchens for 8 years (all kinds, but recently fine dining, farm-to-table). I recently apprenticed for 9 months at the butcher's shop previously mentioned in Marietta Ga. They do local, sustainably raised, whole-animal butchery, and selling fresh cuts, fresh, smoked, poached, and dry-cured sausages, as well as just about anything else under the sun.

  8. #38
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWells View Post
    Thanks for the welcome, glad to be here. I've been lurking for a few months, but have only posted a few times.

    As for my credentials, I have been working in kitchens for 8 years (all kinds, but recently fine dining, farm-to-table). I recently apprenticed for 9 months at the butcher's shop previously mentioned in Marietta Ga. They do local, sustainably raised, whole-animal butchery, and selling fresh cuts, fresh, smoked, poached, and dry-cured sausages, as well as just about anything else under the sun.
    Good stuff. Wish I lived closer I would stop by the butchery. This is a nice place. Lots of great people and info.

  9. #39
    Senior Member markenki's Avatar
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    This is a great thread. I borrowed Ruhlmann and Polcyn's book Charcuterie from the library and will try doing this (pancetta? bacon?) for the first time in a week or two. Wish me luck!

  10. #40
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWells View Post
    Thanks for the welcome, glad to be here. I've been lurking for a few months, but have only posted a few times.

    As for my credentials, I have been working in kitchens for 8 years (all kinds, but recently fine dining, farm-to-table). I recently apprenticed for 9 months at the butcher's shop previously mentioned in Marietta Ga. They do local, sustainably raised, whole-animal butchery, and selling fresh cuts, fresh, smoked, poached, and dry-cured sausages, as well as just about anything else under the sun.
    Welcome! Sounds like every butcher shop I grew up with in Germany. Ahh, the good times.... Even in the land of sausages, most of those butchers have been replaced by supermarkets selling industrial crap. In my hometown is a farmers market that also has a few butchers selling products, 4 carts next to each other. In front of one of them there is always a line. That's a young butcher who follows old local traditions. I once asked him what he does to his ham so that it tastes better than any other ham I could buy. His answer: "Nothing, absolutely nothing...". But sometimes he knows the names of the pigs before he slaughters them.

    Stefan

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