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Thread: Which 210mm Gyuto Should I Buy?

  1. #21
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Just shouting this out:
    Five person passaround for the Yamawaku Nakiri, ending at the new owner, Scott. I mentioned before I was blown away by his generosity, so I'm paying him back . It's a great blade, by a great maker, whose work most of us haven't tried. If anyone is interested, I'm starting a thread in the passaround section.
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Just shouting this out:
    Five person passaround for the Yamawaku Nakiri, ending at the new owner, Scott. I mentioned before I was blown away by his generosity, so I'm paying him back . It's a great blade, by a great maker, whose work most of us haven't tried. If anyone is interested, I'm starting a thread in the passaround section.
    Thanks again Lefty, I'm so excited to use that knife again! And you are the generous one .

    I was talking with my wife today (as she was laughing at me for being so excited about sharpening my knives) and she pointed out that besides wanting a 210mm for ease of use (regarding its length) she mentioned having to lift up the knife when using a push/pull cut and how it hurts her wrist (she has some major issues with her wrist sometimes). Now besides length I guess I'm going to look at something with a lot of belly. Now of the knives that have been mentioned which do you think have quite a bit of belly and would be easier on her wrist, from a quick glance the Saiun to me looks like it has a fair bit.

    So as a recap:

    -$100-$200
    -210mm Gyuto
    -Western Handle
    -Easy on the wrist i.e. weight wise
    -Lots of belly
    -Durable blade and handle.
    -Stainless

  3. #23
    Senior Member
    99Limited's Avatar
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    I would think that a push cut would be the most wrist friendly cutting motion you could do. You have one straight line from your elbow to the tip of the knife and working your arm in a motion similar to a steam engine.

  4. #24
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    No, I think I understand. To do push-cutting, I think the hand has to bend out at the wrist more to keep the blade straighter ahead whereas rock-chopping is done with the blade nearly perpendicular to the forearm so the hand doesn't have to bend out as much at the wrist.

    For more belly, maybe go with: Kanetsugu Pro J, maybe Pro M (small but nice western handles), Shun.

  5. #25
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
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    Only if you're standing square to the board, which is sloppy technique by most standards. If you stand with your dominant side slightly angled away from the board, your "good" foot back about a foot's length from the other, your wrist doesn't move or bend at all when push cutting and it keeps your blade perpendicular to the board. It's also a more comfortable position for long term cutting, which makes for less overall fatigue.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scotts View Post
    Thanks again Lefty, I'm so excited to use that knife again! And you are the generous one .

    I was talking with my wife today (as she was laughing at me for being so excited about sharpening my knives) and she pointed out that besides wanting a 210mm for ease of use (regarding its length) she mentioned having to lift up the knife when using a push/pull cut and how it hurts her wrist (she has some major issues with her wrist sometimes). Now besides length I guess I'm going to look at something with a lot of belly. Now of the knives that have been mentioned which do you think have quite a bit of belly and would be easier on her wrist, from a quick glance the Saiun to me looks like it has a fair bit.

    So as a recap:

    -$100-$200
    -210mm Gyuto
    -Western Handle
    -Easy on the wrist i.e. weight wise
    -Lots of belly
    -Durable blade and handle.
    -Stainless
    This may sound odd, but here goes. Buy the knife you like. Like getting one from Jon. Buy her this.

    http://www.amazon.com/Kyocera-Revolu...7892309&sr=1-2

    They have other colors for handle like pink too. This knife is sharp, light, easy to clean. She will be happy and you will be happy. It will be easy on her wrist. I have had one for years still works great. Even bought my mom one.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by scotts View Post
    Thanks again Lefty, I'm so excited to use that knife again! And you are the generous one .

    I was talking with my wife today (as she was laughing at me for being so excited about sharpening my knives) and she pointed out that besides wanting a 210mm for ease of use (regarding its length) she mentioned having to lift up the knife when using a push/pull cut and how it hurts her wrist (she has some major issues with her wrist sometimes). Now besides length I guess I'm going to look at something with a lot of belly. Now of the knives that have been mentioned which do you think have quite a bit of belly and would be easier on her wrist, from a quick glance the Saiun to me looks like it has a fair bit.

    So as a recap:

    -$100-$200
    -210mm Gyuto
    -Western Handle
    -Easy on the wrist i.e. weight wise
    -Lots of belly
    -Durable blade and handle.
    -Stainless
    carbonext, hiro g3, konosuke, and sakai yusuke all come to mind. maybe even shun...

  8. #28
    Senior Member
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    You want something with a big belly? Here you go.

    Name:  Bigbelly Shun.jpg
Views: 378
Size:  5.8 KB

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vertigo View Post
    Only if you're standing square to the board, which is sloppy technique by most standards. If you stand with your dominant side slightly angled away from the board, your "good" foot back about a foot's length from the other, your wrist doesn't move or bend at all when push cutting and it keeps your blade perpendicular to the board. It's also a more comfortable position for long term cutting, which makes for less overall fatigue.
    I think you are misunderstanding. What I was trying to convey is completely independent of stance and orientation with respect to the board. It has only to do with the angle defined by points at your elbow, center of your wrist and the knuckle on your middle finger.

  10. #30
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
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    Erm. Maybe I *am* misunderstanding. You were just talking about how pushing cutting requires you to bend your wrist to keep the knife "straighter ahead" and rock chopping lets you hold it "perpendicular." Both the things I quoted and italicized are relative explicitly (through the magic of geometry) to your stance and to the orientation of your board. If you alter your stance, the need to bend your wrist to keep the knife "straighter ahead" goes away. It's just like shooting a pool cue. Nobody shoots a pool cue with a bent wrist, and nobody cuts a few hundred gallons of celery with a bent wrist either. The way I--and apparently 99 as well--cuts is much closer to the "steam engine" analogy. The only thing that gets worn out after a crazy long day of cutting is my shoulder.

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