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  1. #11
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rahimlee54 View Post
    Michael Ruhlman said on his blog a little while back his bag of choice is a ziploc.

    This
    I have actually seen that mentioned on a few forums/blogs. Guess I don't have to bite the bullet all at once. I will focus on the two sous vides previously mentioned. Still unsure but the polyscience circulator seems better. Hopefully others will chime in.

  2. #12

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    Dave Arnold at FCI has had good luck with ziplocks.

    Let me find the link.

    -AJ

  3. #13

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    Sous Vide primer here, Part I. There is a second part too. HTH.

    http://www.cookingissues.com/primers...and-sous-vide/

    -AJ

  4. #14
    I'm a home amateur - but I use sous vide fairly often - here are some observations which I hope answer your questions.

    I have the Polyscience Pro Chef - same as you linked from WS. I find it accurate and reliable. I use the large open poly carbonate tub from Poly Sci instead of that big stockpot from WS. It's easier to work with but one caution: The pro chef model has a hard time keeping up to temp with a large/full water bath at the higher temp ranges..eg 85C or so typically used for fruit and veg. I fixed this by making a cover - since I bought mine Polyscience now makes a cover for the plastic tub. With a cover it has no problem maintaining even higher temps.

    I experiemented with all sorts of foods in the beginning, but over time I found my favorite use of sous vide is parcooking proteins at a perfect temp for finishing later, and for eggs (you cold do a whole thread on the many different ways to do sous vide eggs!). The reason I bring this up is that, although I bought an expensive chamber sealer, I don't use that many marinades any more. I primarily seal meats with aromatics, and use whatever might have been the marinade in the final cook. Great examples are scallops or beef/veal tenderloin. Take beef...I vac seal just with salt/pepper thyme and sous vide at 59/60. It's evenly cooked throughout - then when you serve you can sear briefly on high heat with butter, thyme, shallots, garlic etc, and create a crust with the flavors in the pan. Long story short - I wouldn't make the ability to handle wet marinades the key factor in your vac sealer decision.

    On the other hand - I do prefer a sealer with a stong vacuum, coupled with a thicker plastic bag - as compared to the Ruhlman technique. The reason is I want soft foods to hold their shape. Although it may seem counter-intuiitive a weak vacuum seems to 'suck' suck on the bag forever, and eventually deform your food. Think scallops - you want a nice round scallop, not one squeezed out of shape. The stronger sealer I have seems to draw the air out of the bag very quickly, and maintain the shape of the food despite a very stong vacuum. Just my two cents on the subject

  5. #15
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajhuff View Post
    Sous Vide primer here, Part I. There is a second part too. HTH.

    http://www.cookingissues.com/primers...and-sous-vide/

    -AJ
    Thanks for the link. Did a cursory scan. I will go back and read it in depth. Looks good.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Namaxy View Post
    I'm a home amateur - but I use sous vide fairly often - here are some observations which I hope answer your questions.

    I have the Polyscience Pro Chef - same as you linked from WS. I find it accurate and reliable. I use the large open poly carbonate tub from Poly Sci instead of that big stockpot from WS. It's easier to work with but one caution: The pro chef model has a hard time keeping up to temp with a large/full water bath at the higher temp ranges..eg 85C or so typically used for fruit and veg. I fixed this by making a cover - since I bought mine Polyscience now makes a cover for the plastic tub. With a cover it has no problem maintaining even higher temps.

    I experiemented with all sorts of foods in the beginning, but over time I found my favorite use of sous vide is parcooking proteins at a perfect temp for finishing later, and for eggs (you cold do a whole thread on the many different ways to do sous vide eggs!). The reason I bring this up is that, although I bought an expensive chamber sealer, I don't use that many marinades any more. I primarily seal meats with aromatics, and use whatever might have been the marinade in the final cook. Great examples are scallops or beef/veal tenderloin. Take beef...I vac seal just with salt/pepper thyme and sous vide at 59/60. It's evenly cooked throughout - then when you serve you can sear briefly on high heat with butter, thyme, shallots, garlic etc, and create a crust with the flavors in the pan. Long story short - I wouldn't make the ability to handle wet marinades the key factor in your vac sealer decision.

    On the other hand - I do prefer a sealer with a stong vacuum, coupled with a thicker plastic bag - as compared to the Ruhlman technique. The reason is I want soft foods to hold their shape. Although it may seem counter-intuiitive a weak vacuum seems to 'suck' suck on the bag forever, and eventually deform your food. Think scallops - you want a nice round scallop, not one squeezed out of shape. The stronger sealer I have seems to draw the air out of the bag very quickly, and maintain the shape of the food despite a very stong vacuum. Just my two cents on the subject
    Thanks for your input. Guess that's the one to try then. What sealer are you using and are you happy with it or wish you had a different one?

  7. #17
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    Namaxy, I have the same gear and have followed the same food experimentation path and could not agree with you more. One thing that is never talked about is that you can sous vide slow or fast. Fast is shorter cooking times, slow is longer. I also have a jury-rigged crock-pot PID set-up that I use for all the sous vide cooking I do for longer periods (which is about 80% of my SV cooking). As much as I love to see the poly sci in action, its kinda annoying to have the pump circulating water for 50 hours. See my 50hr Chick steak

    http://i1051.photobucket.com/albums/...toii/chuck.jpg

    I use the Vac Master VP--112 and love it. I'm a big fan of over kill end even could be challenged justifying the next level of chamber vac. You can do infused fruit, how much more pressure do you want than that? Most of the time you run these machines between 40 and 60% of their capability.


    Quote Originally Posted by Namaxy View Post
    I'm a home amateur - but I use sous vide fairly often - here are some observations which I hope answer your questions.

    I have the Polyscience Pro Chef - same as you linked from WS. I find it accurate and reliable. I use the large open poly carbonate tub from Poly Sci instead of that big stockpot from WS. It's easier to work with but one caution: The pro chef model has a hard time keeping up to temp with a large/full water bath at the higher temp ranges..eg 85C or so typically used for fruit and veg. I fixed this by making a cover - since I bought mine Polyscience now makes a cover for the plastic tub. With a cover it has no problem maintaining even higher temps.

    I experiemented with all sorts of foods in the beginning, but over time I found my favorite use of sous vide is parcooking proteins at a perfect temp for finishing later, and for eggs (you cold do a whole thread on the many different ways to do sous vide eggs!). The reason I bring this up is that, although I bought an expensive chamber sealer, I don't use that many marinades any more. I primarily seal meats with aromatics, and use whatever might have been the marinade in the final cook. Great examples are scallops or beef/veal tenderloin. Take beef...I vac seal just with salt/pepper thyme and sous vide at 59/60. It's evenly cooked throughout - then when you serve you can sear briefly on high heat with butter, thyme, shallots, garlic etc, and create a crust with the flavors in the pan. Long story short - I wouldn't make the ability to handle wet marinades the key factor in your vac sealer decision.

    On the other hand - I do prefer a sealer with a stong vacuum, coupled with a thicker plastic bag - as compared to the Ruhlman technique. The reason is I want soft foods to hold their shape. Although it may seem counter-intuiitive a weak vacuum seems to 'suck' suck on the bag forever, and eventually deform your food. Think scallops - you want a nice round scallop, not one squeezed out of shape. The stronger sealer I have seems to draw the air out of the bag very quickly, and maintain the shape of the food despite a very stong vacuum. Just my two cents on the subject

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Deckhand View Post
    Thanks for your input. Guess that's the one to try then. What sealer are you using and are you happy with it or wish you had a different one?
    I use the Vacmaster 210. Very pleased with it, although my only prior experience (ownership wise) was a cheap ish Casco sealer. When i owned the Casco, I had the chance to try high end vacmasters playing around in a local restaurant, and easily saw the quality difference.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Thanks for everyone's input it really helps. I feel a lot better purchasing in the near future after hearing these opinions.

  10. #20
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    I aswell have the poly science unit. Find it great for sous at home. Yeah u will have to cover the plastic lexan if you want to get it to max temp.
    I just use a stock pot, find it more efficient.

    As far as vacuum sealer vs chamber vac. Question is how serious are you about this cooking method. Do you want to invest a lot of money in one?
    Yeah theres pro's and con's to both. i use a vacuum sealer at home. I can't sous liquids or compress fruit. But I'm ok with that.

    At the restaurant i have a Chamber Vac that can do everything you want. Its nice but it was 3800$ . Yeah theres cheaper ones that are good for home.

    I would say just try a vacuum sealer for 100-200$, try it. See how it works, practice your technique. Then if it works well your good. Or sell it and for the chamber Vac.

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