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  1. #11
    The alleles created by mutation may be beneficial

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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    I think that is just because he is used to using a duller knife, and the angle he holds it against the bone works like the Bic Pen test. The more acute knife will work just fine, and the front of the edge will face more in the direction of the motion.
    Did you read the spoiler? He is one of the best in the world at breaking down fish.

  2. #12

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    I like testing for bite using paper.
    I tried downgrading a knife by polishing it up to 12k and then successively going back to coarser stones. Cutting paper between each downgrade gave me the feel how much the bite can increase without the knife loosing sharpness.

  3. #13
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    Bourdain worked Justo into a quickfire challenge for this season's Top Chef all stars. The contestants watched him break down fish, then it was their turn....

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZarDNgM2Bo

    http://eatocracy.cnn.com/2011/02/25/the-fish-butcher/

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by iceman01 View Post
    I like testing for bite using paper.
    I tried downgrading a knife by polishing it up to 12k and then successively going back to coarser stones. Cutting paper between each downgrade gave me the feel how much the bite can increase without the knife loosing sharpness.
    That's a good test. Everyone should try this sometime.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew H View Post
    Did you read the spoiler? He is one of the best in the world at breaking down fish.
    Never said he wasn't skilled, just that he has a different skill set. He is used to doing it one way, and perhaps he can cut fish better than any other human on the planet. Doesn't mean that he knows how to do it every way. He was stating that he prefers a "medium sharp" knife, which doesn't have any defined meaning, he was being colloquial--he is a cook, after all.

    My point was, a more acute knife will work just as well--but Bourdain's man doesn't prefer it, and I posit that it is because it is simply not what he is used to. It's like a some people putting cream in their coffee before the sugar, and vice versa. You get the same results, but people do it differently.

  6. #16
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    The only time that I do find it helpful for a knife to not be super hair popping sharp is when separating large muscle groups & silver skin from leg meat of say a pig or beef quarter. I feel like it makes cleaner work separating the muscles from the leg by taking them off the bone in whole pieces, I feel like a super sharp knife can simply glide right through the delicate membrane and silver skin, when all I need it to do is just help me split them apart. Just my .02.
    Proper Preparation Prevents Piss Poor Performance.

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  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by iceman01 View Post
    I like testing for bite using paper.
    I tried downgrading a knife by polishing it up to 12k and then successively going back to coarser stones. Cutting paper between each downgrade gave me the feel how much the bite can increase without the knife loosing sharpness.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    That's a good test. Everyone should try this sometime.
    Everybody knows to test sharpness by cutting paper. You are after the feeling and sound that the edge cuts the paper instead of tearing it apart. When it comes to bite your ears and hands can trick you. You don't feel the knife gliding through the paper like a warm knife through butter. You hear a sizzling noise but that's not dullness, that's the bite on a very sharp knife.

  8. #18
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    I don’t butchered fish much, but can relate to what he’s saying. I used to intentionally dull my knife by slicing into the cutting board a few times cause I could feel it riding along the skin and ticking against the pin bones - better. Otherwise, it would cut through the skin and bones too easily.

    I like stupidly sharp, highly polished edge that can whittle hair as much as anyone, just not for certain tasks. I prefer a less refined / toothier type edge when cutting fibrous things like rope, cardboard, and my sister-in-law’ roasts.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by iceman01 View Post
    Everybody knows to test sharpness by cutting paper. You are after the feeling and sound that the edge cuts the paper instead of tearing it apart. When it comes to bite your ears and hands can trick you. You don't feel the knife gliding through the paper like a warm knife through butter. You hear a sizzling noise but that's not dullness, that's the bite on a very sharp knife.

    I wasn't referring to the paper part (per Se) but that you tested between stones to feel the difference.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    Never said he wasn't skilled, just that he has a different skill set. He is used to doing it one way, and perhaps he can cut fish better than any other human on the planet. Doesn't mean that he knows how to do it every way. He was stating that he prefers a "medium sharp" knife, which doesn't have any defined meaning, he was being colloquial--he is a cook, after all.

    My point was, a more acute knife will work just as well--but Bourdain's man doesn't prefer it, and I posit that it is because it is simply not what he is used to. It's like a some people putting cream in their coffee before the sugar, and vice versa. You get the same results, but people do it differently.
    Not to be offensive, but the reason I believe him is because he breaks down 700 pounds of fish a day at (arguably) the top seafood restaurant in the world. Why do you think a more acute knife will work?

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