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Thread: How kind is End Grain Tasmanian Blackwood on knives?

  1. #11
    Very nice looking board!

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by schanop View Post
    Thank dav. I saw that page while researching. Dave's Board Smith FAQ recommends number between 800-1600. 1700 is just a touch above. It seems that a lot of craftsmen in Australia/Tasmania in particular seem to use this wood a lot for cutting board, mostly edge grain though.

    I've used it for dinner prep (grilled pork belly, rice, and sea veggie miso soup), so only did a bit of cutting on the board. I can see a lot more of cut marks compared with my previous cheaper boards, so it appears to be a bit softer, at least at the surface level.
    Nice looking board. You might consider mounting rubber feet on one side, so moisture won't accumulate underneath. I can send you some with the knife if you like.

    Also, not familiar with the wood, but would recommend oiling the board with mineral oil. At 3cm thickness the board is on a thinner side and could be affected by moisture (warp).

    As far as hardness is concerned, you will be fine.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  3. #13
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    Thank Marko for generosity, I'll take up the offer. So soon, the elder shig brother will find a home. Gotta wait a bit more.

    This board is 5 cm/2" thick. On the bay store, they have some smaller and thinner sizes available as well. So Ozie members, please have a look. Bay pictures weren't as impressive as the actual board I've got. Could be because of anything.

    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    Nice looking board. You might consider mounting rubber feet on one side, so moisture won't accumulate underneath. I can send you some with the knife if you like.

    Also, not familiar with the wood, but would recommend oiling the board with mineral oil. At 3cm thickness the board is on a thinner side and could be affected by moisture (warp).

    As far as hardness is concerned, you will be fine.

    M

  4. #14
    Weird Wood Pusher Burl Source's Avatar
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    Stunning Board.
    In my opinion you got a bargain.
    The Tasmanian Blackwood is easily mistaken for Koa.
    The only concern is that both are prone to end grain checking.
    But.....that will never become an issue as long as you keep the board oiled and never put it in the dishwasher.
    Mark Farley / Burl Source
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  5. #15
    2" is a good thickness. For some reason I thought it was 3cm.

    Although it is made of thinner boards and laid out vertically, for what you paid is a great deal. Looking at a layout, it will be a stable board. I would still attach feet and oil it periodically. I have seen couple of boards warp on me, so better be safe than sorry.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  6. #16
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    Mark, what is end grain checking?

  7. #17
    Still Plays With Blocks
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    End grain checking is a crack that develops near the end of a piece of stock as it dries. As the moisture leaves a piece of wood, the wood shrinks, sometimes evenly sometimes unevenly, which is what leads to cracking. As I stated, the cracks show up mostly at the ends of a piece of stock but they can also be in the middle. When a piece of wood is cut, the ends are coated with a material that slows the moisture loss the minimize checking. Even though it has been coated, small cracks can still appear.

  8. #18
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    Thanks.

    Mental note, oil board tonight.

  9. #19
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    It's been a month and a half with this board now. I think the board is pretty good for what I paid. The cutting surface is quite kind to knife edge once the surface coating has worn off.

    I'm not sure what it is, but the board came with plasticky looking surface that seems to be a bit harder than the actual wood. The coating helps the board resist moisture a little bit, but it seems to be not so kind to thin usuba edge. However, after many cuts, many rounds of oiling, and some quick sanding to smooth out the surface a little, I am quite happy with how it is now.

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