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Thread: Kitchen Scores- Post your new gear here

  1. #211
    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
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    I've been sitting on a gift certificate to Williams-Sonoma since last June, and decided to put it towards my first enameled cast iron (25% off all cookware at WS until tomorrow night at midnight). After a fair amount of research, I decided on two Staub pieces: a round 7-Qt, and a round 2.75-Qt.


  2. #212
    Senior Member AFKitchenknivesguy's Avatar
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    Awesome choice!
    Jason

  3. #213
    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AFKitchenknivesguy View Post
    Awesome choice!
    Glad you think so! I thought about posting here for advice on size/shape/brand (the Staub vs. Le Creuset question), but read a great deal on a few cookware forums and ended up just going with what I liked the looks of the most (the deep blue Staub). I have been in the mood for stew making since the weather here finally turned, and also want to try the famous "no-knead bread" recipe, which calls for a dutch oven.

  4. #214
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Excellent choice, I also make my bread in a Staub Dutch oven, but a smaller one around 5qt. For the 7qt. pot I would recommend 500g AP flour, 500g whole wheat flour (you can replace 150g of that with rye flour for an even heartier taste), a good 2 1/2 teaspoons of salt, a teaspoon of good yeast. Mix that well. Add a good teaspoon of honey to approx. 770g/ml of water, mix well, add to the flour mix and stir with a wooden spoon until it just comes together as a dough. Let it sit for 14-18h at room temperature (well, Hawaiian room temperature ), after that you can keep it in the fridge for another day or two if you don't get to baking right away. I let the dough proof in a transparent plastic tub with a lid. Flour surface and hands, take out the fairly wet dough and fold over onto itself from 4 sides. Cover for 20 minutes. Flour hands again and form a ball by pinching it together on the underside - I just turn it in a circle a few times for that. The underside will later be the top when you transfer it to the pot. Flour a clean towel well on one side, place the dough on it, flour the top of the dough and fold the other side of the towel over it. Let it rise for about 2h. After 1 1/2h or a bit earlier (depends on your oven) turn on the oven to about 500F with the pot and lid in it. When the oven has been at 500F for a moment, take out the pot, carfully take the dough, turn it upside down and plop it in the pot. Shake a bit so it is fairly round - not really necessary, it will straighten itself out anyway, but I still do it... Turn the oven temp down to 435F and bake with the lid on for about 35min plus another 15-20 min without the lid. You will have to play with the water amount to get the hydration right - when it looks juuust a little to wet, it's just right; you may also have to play with the baking times. Internal temperature should be close to 210 when it's done. The honey is optional, I find it rounds it out a little bit and adds a little bit of color. I actually use sugar beet syrup instead of honey. Maybe you could also use molasses, I just don't like the taste lf that and never have it at home. Caveat: I'm not a baker and maybe there are even better ways, but this is how I make mine (with slightly lower amounts) and I love how it comes out - it will be very dense and chewy with a thick crust compared to any American bread I know. If you want it lighter, increase the AP flour ratio and use a little less water.

    HTH,

    Stefan

  5. #215
    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
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    Wow, thanks for all the detailed instructions and advice, Stefan! I won't have time for this until next weekend (start Saturday, finish Sunday), but am looking forward to it. I debated getting the 5.5-Qt. version (as opposed to the 7-Qt., which was the next size up), but the original "no-knead bread" recipe calls for a "6 to 8-Qt. heavy covered pan," and I concluded I would be better off with a little too much room for most recipes than not enough. I'm certain that I will use the smaller 2.75-Qt. size more often (I live alone, and generally only cook for one other person, or a small group of four to six at the most).

  6. #216
    daveb's Avatar
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    I picked up a 2.75 on the cheap when Staub discontinued Teal. Pilaf machine.
    Dave
    Older and wider.

  7. #217
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    I'd love t pick up a larger 9 or 11qt oval Dutch oven at some point. But since I also live by myself and don't cook for an army that often, I kept postponing it. No problem, with the bread recipe, I couldn't sleep and was bored I started increasing the flour amount, in my 5qt I use 750g, so the amount for a larger pot is just an estimate. If you use too little dough in a larger pot, it will just come out flatter.

    Stefan

  8. #218
    Senior Member ChiliPepper's Avatar
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    Yes! Definitely way to go for a good and crusty homemade bread. My recipe is simpler than Stephan's : I put ,in this order exactly, 310 ml water, 450g of whatever mix of flour you fancy (i use amix of high grade and durum semola), 30g of crumbled fresh yeast, a spoonful of dry yeast, one and half teaspoons salt, a sprinkle of extra virgin olive oil. Put all that in my bread machine just for the kneading but you could follow the "no kneading" system and just quickly mix the whole lot.After that you transfer to a recipient, cover with a towel and leave in the warmest part of your house (I put it on top of my hot water cylinder...) for a good 6 hrs, 4 hours can do if you're in an emergency.flour lightly the bottom of the enameled pot, transfer the mix, dust the top with flour, put the lid on and in the oven (which you had warmed up to its max, whatever that is on your model, mine goes to 260 degrees centigrades). Roughly 30 min with lid on and then 20 min without - or whenever it gets the crust you desire!

  9. #219
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    Holy crap, mom got me a Vitamix!

  10. #220
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    Christmas haul, now to learn to use it.


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