Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Sichuan Cookery – Hardcover or paperback/softcover?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    69

    Sichuan Cookery – Hardcover or paperback/softcover?

    Dear all,

    I am about to purchase the (UK version of) Fuchsia Dunlop’s „Sichuan Cookery“. Have any of you had both the hardcover (2001) and the paperback/softcover (2003) versions in your hands, and which would you prefer? I often find hardcover better bound, but sometimes a bit less practical.

    Best regards!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,073
    I have all of Fuchsia's hard bound books and use them constantly.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    69
    Quote Originally Posted by Noodle Soup View Post
    I have all of Fuchsia's hard bound books and use them constantly.
    Thanks, Noodle Soup, I guess I’ll go for the hardbound first edition then. They are not really that easy to find any more.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,073
    I'm enough of a Fuchsia fan that I made a point of making a pilgrimage to the Sichuan cooking school she studied at in Chengdu. Wish I had the time and money to study there but I had to settle for one of the smaller schools in town.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,073
    Ok, checking Amazon I see "Sichuan Cookery" is one I don't have. Kind of spendy isn't it?

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Involves Germans. Lots of Germans.
    Posts
    1,825
    Anyone got the fabled "Sichuan Cuisine in Both Chinese and English"? Is it worth the exorbitant prices an import costs?

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    69
    Quote Originally Posted by LifeByA1000Cuts View Post
    Anyone got the fabled "Sichuan Cuisine in Both Chinese and English"? Is it worth the exorbitant prices an import costs?
    Full online access costs 60 cents. It’s definitely worth that!

    I have not read it extensively, but to me it seems to be much about presenting the recipe varieties that are the most common ground, middle of the road that is, and therefore probably not always very authentic, in the meaning that the particular version may have never existed, but every part of it has. A bit like an eclectic Urtext edition of a Bach cantata. However, it is an interesting insight in the standardization of the culinary heritage, and of course interesting to see how the agreed-upon recipes look.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Involves Germans. Lots of Germans.
    Posts
    1,825
    Oh ok, just saw the printed versions coming at outrageous prices So it kind of has.... traditional recipes seen through the lens of professional chefs, as would be the case for a Sanjeev Kapoor/Sanjay Thumma/Harpal Singh Sookhi recipe in Indian cuisine?

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    69
    Quote Originally Posted by LifeByA1000Cuts View Post
    Oh ok, just saw the printed versions coming at outrageous prices So it kind of has.... traditional recipes seen through the lens of professional chefs, as would be the case for a Sanjeev Kapoor/Sanjay Thumma/Harpal Singh Sookhi recipe in Indian cuisine?
    Well, I am no expert, but that is my personal feeling. Nevertheless, it is a very interesting book.

    You can have a look with this preview.

    I do not know these indian books and their story. Tell me more!

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Involves Germans. Lots of Germans.
    Posts
    1,825
    These three are more known for a lot of YT presence than book authors - all of them former or current professional chefs...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •