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Thread: Shun Premier vs. Shun Reserves

  1. #1

    Shun Premier vs. Shun Reserves

    Do you (preferably owner of Reserves) think the Reserves are noticeably better knives than the Premiers functionally (sharper...and maybe aesthetically)? With it's use of a different and more exotic steel combination?

    I priced out an "essentials" set and they are roughly the same. Difference is I don't see a fork for the Reserve knives to use with the carving knife included in this set http://www.internetkitchenstore.com/...idproduct=2570. Whereas, I can get a Premier set w/ the fork.

  2. #2
    The alleles created by mutation may be beneficial


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    First off welcome to the forum, BDD.

    Shuns aren't bad by any means, but you could definitely get much more out of $1200 with other makers. The main difference between the knives is the core steel, SG2 vs. VG-10. Both are stainless and pretty good kitchen steel knives. VG-10 doesn't get a ton of love on this site, and SG2 should hold your edge longer. Until you start sharpening yourself, which is very enjoyable and rewarding, you won't notice a huge difference between steels.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew H View Post
    First off welcome to the forum, BDD.

    Shuns aren't bad by any means, but you could definitely get much more out of $1200 with other makers. The main difference between the knives is the core steel, SG2 vs. VG-10. Both are stainless and pretty good kitchen steel knives. VG-10 doesn't get a ton of love on this site, and SG2 should hold your edge longer. Until you start sharpening yourself, which is very enjoyable and rewarding, you won't notice a huge difference between steels.
    Thanks.

    To have the Reserves hold the sharpness a little longer? For a home user? Probably not worth the extra cost.

    I am looking at MAC and Tojiro too. Tojiro, being one of the best bang for the buck. Unfortunately they don't make a carving life/fork set. So I'd have to buy from another brand (like maybe Shun's Premier line). Then there's steak knives...which Tojiro also doesn't make.

    Other suggestions?

  4. #4
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
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    Are you fixed on having everything come as a set with a block? What types of knives do you specifically need? Is $1200 or so roughly what you're looking to spend?

  5. #5
    The best idea IMO is to mix and match a bunch of different makers. For nerds like us thats the fun part, getting to try out different makers and steels.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Vertigo View Post
    Are you fixed on having everything come as a set with a block? What types of knives do you specifically need? Is $1200 or so roughly what you're looking to spend?
    Well, I don't NEED TO get a set from the same brand. Like I said I could buy some Tojiro (gyuto, bread & utility). Then buy the Shun Premier carving/fork set. It just happens that the Shun Premier line carries all the knives i'm looking to buy. The Reserves near the same money (minus the Reserve fork...can't handle them or do a tomato cutting test).

    if any of you have specific recommendations instead of my Tojiro/Shun Premier idea...that and with the Tojiro...I can't handle them or see them first...i would have to order online and hope i like how they feel in my hands.

  7. #7
    henckels and whustof both sell matching sets and cost less...profile is similar to shun and f&f is likely better imho...

  8. #8
    Shun Reserve line looks like a continuation (with a slight redesign) of Shun BK line. SG2 is not particularly user friendly steel ( high wear resistance, difficult to sharpen on water stones). Buying a knife that you have to send out to sharpen (and pay for it), doesn't seem to make much sense. Sharpening your knife is is an integral part of an experience of owning a knife.

    You don't get much edge retention on Henckels or Wuesthof, as both are known to heat treat their knives not particularly hard and their steel selection on their SS knives is not that great. I don't know what line you are referring to, so can't comment on steel. Fit and finish should be good, as these are likely machine-made knives.

    M


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BDD View Post
    Do you (preferably owner of Reserves) think the Reserves are noticeably better knives than the Premiers functionally (sharper...and maybe aesthetically)? With it's use of a different and more exotic steel combination?

    I priced out an "essentials" set and they are roughly the same. Difference is I don't see a fork for the Reserve knives to use with the carving knife included in this set http://www.internetkitchenstore.com/...idproduct=2570. Whereas, I can get a Premier set w/ the fork.
    The Shun Reserve knives appear to be the old Shun Kramer line without the Kramer markings or mosaic pin. The SG2 steel is at least a step above the VG10 of the Premier line, and will be most apparent in increased edge retention for the Reserve.

    Whether the aesthetics of a matching set of knives is more important to you is entirely your call. Most everyone here has what could be termed an eclectic collection of knives because performance is valued more than uniformity, and that will affect the recommendations you get. You could have the best of both worlds by having custom handles put on some high performing knives and having a fork rehandled to match as well. Pierre Rodrigue has done some really stunning forks - see them here: http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...I-ll-be-forked!

    Actually, if I was going to spend the kind of cash you are on Shuns, I'd be talking to Pierre about some custom knives. A chef's, a slicer, a fork, a boning knife and a small utility from Pierre is going to be in the ballpark of what you are about to spend on factory made knives.

    If you decide not to "mix and match", and to stay with one knife line, Henckels and Wusthof have been mentioned as alternatives, and you may want to look at the Sabatier knives at The Best Things: http://www.thebestthings.com/knives/sabatier.htm

    Oh, and welcome to KKF!

    Rick

  10. #10
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
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    Quote Originally Posted by BDD View Post
    if any of you have specific recommendations instead of my Tojiro/Shun Premier idea...that and with the Tojiro...I can't handle them or see them first...i would have to order online and hope i like how they feel in my hands.
    Kochi 240mm Kurouchi Wa Gyuto - $280
    Konosuke 270mm White #2 Sujihiki - $204
    Tojiro DP Boning Knife - $99
    Tojiro ITK Bread Knife - $63
    Gesshin Ginga 180mm Stainless Petty - $180
    OXO Good Grips Grill Fork - $11
    500/1200/5000 grit water stone set with loupe and deburring block included - $150
    Boardsmith 2" x 16" x 22" Hard Maple endgrain cutting board - $152

    Total: $1139 + shipping costs

    The joy you'll feel in 6 months when you realize you're a lot happier with your sweet knives, awesome board, and your ability to sharpen than your Shun Set could have ever made you: Priceless

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