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Thread: pinch on j-knives

  1. #11
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    I use a pinch on a gyuto, except rarely (just like a western chef's). Slight modifications because of the lack of bolster and some "neck", perhaps - but that depends on the knife. It's basically the standard pinch. Other types of knife, not so much.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    I've always had good knife skills, and always used a pinch with my Forschners and other Euro blades.

    So when I first started using j-knives, this is what I started with naturally...but without even knowing it, I've realized that my grip has changed over time, and I have not used a pinch in years--it doesn't even feel good if I try it now. The natural leverage of the blade seems to be diminished and dampened with your hand choked up on it.

    This is all my personal opinion, so do what feels best to you. I'm not trying to preach one way being better than the other, just sharing my experience and encouraging others to try another way.

    Not that it matters, but just some food for thought--the best cutters don't seem to use a pinch grip on their gyutos.

  3. #13
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin0505 View Post
    For me, its dependant on both the knife and the type of cuts im making. Experimenting and getting comfortable with multiple grips and motions is a practical endevor as well as fun.
    I agree. Lately I've been enjoying pinching my buffalo ferrule instead of the blade. Works for me. I can't wait for someone to tell me I'm doing it all wrong

  4. #14
    I've used a pinch grip as long as I can remember. Lately though, I've noticed on some knives that my middle finger slides up onto the blade, and earlier this week, without even thinking about it, I started using the finger point when doing tip work. I feel that the knives are training my hand to use them without my knowledge, so whatever feels most comfortable is best, regardless of what someone else says.

  5. #15

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    On my gyuto, I generally use a pinch grip. On my petty, I generally use a finger point grip.

    -AJ

  6. #16
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    I have never used the pinch grip, and probably never will. Finger point is one of my primary grips along with some others, it changes with what I am cutting and cutting technique.

  7. #17
    Senior Member VoodooMajik's Avatar
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    It depends on which area of what blade I'm using and what I'm doing with it. I tend to point with my middle finger on the bladewhen using the tip especially in the 270+ range, lines everything up nicely. choke up when using the middle of the blade, and almost a loose hammer if I move to the back 1/3 or a very flat blade like a nakiri. They kind of show you how they want to be held. My wrist problems have stopped now because of using better knives and adjusting my technique ( I also stack poly boards with a sani on top to keep my posture straight) If I kept trucking through with the old german blades I probly would be cutting my career short.
    It's not the Answer it's the Experience

  8. #18
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    I probably use a pinch and an index-finger-on-the-side grip for just about everything.

  9. #19
    Senior Member hambone.johnson's Avatar
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    I have become more loose with my grips lately. I use the finger over the spine for all protiene slicing, both service and butchering, also for specific garnish work, when i am using my 210 i use just the handle, if i use a 240 or bigger, sometimes pinch grip, sometimes just handle. i really use it on a base by base situation. the other thing is that a lack of pinch grip and more handle grip and more finger over spine grip has allowed me to relax and i dont have as much fatigue. ive also changed kitchens in the last 5 months so that always forces you to adapt to a different work space and different hours and type of work. dont be too rigid with your grips, all the formats can be utilized and different knives will work better with different grips too. fluid is best

  10. #20
    Thanks folks! What I got out of this btw is that ultimately with the lighter knives that the pinch is probably fine, that I should mess around with finger pointing, and most importantly use a grip that will help you relax your hand and arm. I do know that it is nicer to cut when not using a death grip. I grew up playing golf and was always told to grip the club like a bird--not hard enough to hurt it, but not so loose that it could fly away...guessing I should try to relate that to my knives.

    Cheers,
    Chinacats

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