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Thread: Lookin' for a little help...

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle View Post
    I don't have a Komodo Kamado but I have been using my dad's FEC-100 for the last 4 years and it's a great cooker. I used it this past Sunday to do 3 racks of spares, 3 8lb butts and a 15 lb brisket. In my opinion it gives you a more subtle smoke profile compared to an offset or even something like a UDS. You also don't get a very pronounced smoke ring without utilizing specific techniques/tricks, but being able to go to sleep or even just have a little too much to drink at the party without worrying about temp control is pretty great.

    I do have a Comet Kamado (BGE knockoff) and I'm totally sold on ceramic cooking and I do know that when I start my fire correctly I can get very stable temps for long periods without issue, but there's no way I could have fit 60 lbs of meat on that thing.
    Thanks for the info. You're one of the few people I've come across that has an FEC 100 here in California.

    I hope I'm not prying by asking this, but I've also read about issues getting a smoke ring on products cooked in an FEC100 as well as issues with the level of smoke in the product. Do you happen to know how to get a better smoke ring and more smoke into the product?

    I assume it's because of the pellets and how the pellets are not only for smoke, but heat as well. From what I've seen when I judged some competitions, at a higher temp, there was very little smoke coming out of the smoker, mostly flame. So I'm assuming that you would have to start off at a slower temperature to get enough smoke to create the ring and get a good amount of smoke into the product. Or maybe cycle the cooker so you burn some fuel - start it up, then slow it down, and back and forth so that you get a good amount of smoke, but lower circulation?

    Also, did you guys buy your cooker directly from Cookshack? I'm a little bummed I didn't buy this a few years ago. The prices has increased at least $700 since I started considering buying it about 5 years ago.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  2. #22
    Doug -

    That may very well have been where I saw your name. I've been a KCBS member since 2005 and have been regularly reading the KCBS newsletter since then.

    I'm aware of the issues with that Kamado company. I've basically narrowed my choices to the BGE and the Komodo, although the prices are drastically different. I may try and get a once used BGE X-Large at an Eggfest this year. $3000+ is just so much to spend on a single cooker with little capacity.

    Nonetheless, if I had that kind of money to spend, I would buy a Komodo Kamado. It seems like such a well thought out and designed product, and the only product certified not to have any asbestos or otherwise harmful materials in it. (I'm definitely not implying that the other makers do, but at least the supplier of the refractory materials to Komodo certifies that it does not have any asbestos.)
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    Thanks for the info. You're one of the few people I've come across that has an FEC 100 here in California.

    I hope I'm not prying by asking this, but I've also read about issues getting a smoke ring on products cooked in an FEC100 as well as issues with the level of smoke in the product. Do you happen to know how to get a better smoke ring and more smoke into the product?

    I assume it's because of the pellets and how the pellets are not only for smoke, but heat as well. From what I've seen when I judged some competitions, at a higher temp, there was very little smoke coming out of the smoker, mostly flame. So I'm assuming that you would have to start off at a slower temperature to get enough smoke to create the ring and get a good amount of smoke into the product. Or maybe cycle the cooker so you burn some fuel - start it up, then slow it down, and back and forth so that you get a good amount of smoke, but lower circulation?

    Also, did you guys buy your cooker directly from Cookshack? I'm a little bummed I didn't buy this a few years ago. The prices has increased at least $700 since I started considering buying it about 5 years ago.
    My understanding is the pellets burn too clean clean and are too efficient that they don't produce the pronounced smoke ring. The easy/cheater technique for a smoke ring is to use Tender Quick. With TQ you can get a smoke ring in the oven. As for producing a real smoke ring on an FEC, I've read that people start with low heat for the first couple hours and then bumping it up. I've also read that whether or not the meat is cold or room temp plays some part in creating the smoke ring, but I don't know more than that. I don't compete so the smoke ring is pretty irrelevent to me, although it is really cool to see it.

  4. #24
    I have an FEC 100. If you want a smoke ring you can do what Kyle mentioned. You can also build a little contraption that holds wood chunks near the fire pot, but doesn't allow the chunks to fall into the fire pot. Kinda looks like a live trap for a small rodent. The flames from the fire will slowly burn the chunks and that will produce more smoke. For comps I used to start my meat on my off-set, cook for 2 hours, then transfer the meat to the FEC so that I could get some sleep. Huge smoke ring!

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle View Post
    My understanding is the pellets burn too clean clean and are too efficient that they don't produce the pronounced smoke ring. The easy/cheater technique for a smoke ring is to use Tender Quick. With TQ you can get a smoke ring in the oven. As for producing a real smoke ring on an FEC, I've read that people start with low heat for the first couple hours and then bumping it up. I've also read that whether or not the meat is cold or room temp plays some part in creating the smoke ring, but I don't know more than that. I don't compete so the smoke ring is pretty irrelevent to me, although it is really cool to see it.
    I also thought that something like Tender Quick would come into play. But, I'm not cool with using products like that. I use as little preservatives as possible, and avoid using ingredients with nitrates or MSG when I cook.

    I put my meat in super cold when I start cooking and get a nice smoke ring on my Weber. From what I recall, it has to do with the hemoglobin in the meat.

    Thanks Kyle for the info. Sorry to bring this up again, but do you know where you guys bought it? Is there a California dealer that has them? I'd like to personally take a look at a new one.

    Thanks again.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by monty View Post
    I have an FEC 100. If you want a smoke ring you can do what Kyle mentioned. You can also build a little contraption that holds wood chunks near the fire pot, but doesn't allow the chunks to fall into the fire pot. Kinda looks like a live trap for a small rodent. The flames from the fire will slowly burn the chunks and that will produce more smoke. For comps I used to start my meat on my off-set, cook for 2 hours, then transfer the meat to the FEC so that I could get some sleep. Huge smoke ring!
    That's another way to do it. I hate messing with electronic equipment (unlike manual equipment, which you can tinker with constantly), but you gotta do what you gotta do to WIN, right?
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  7. #27
    In the smokeing stage of the process, is there any benifit or advantage in useing wet woodchips over dry, or even in conjunction with? Is there a wood that accentuates the meat better, whether beef or pork? What duration of smoke do you guys like to use?


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  8. #28
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    I recently read a report that stated that dry wood was better than wet for this purpose, I think it came from Meathead over at "Amazing Ribs.com".
    I will leave the rest for the pros to respond.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
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  9. #29

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    I have always used dry wood cut into approx fist size chunks. -Doug

  10. #30
    The concept of wet woodchips makes no sense to me. To get good clean thin blue smoke your fire has to be burning cleanly. Wet wood? I use two baseball sized chunks of wood with a charcoal fire to BBQ indirect.
    Cherry for Ribs, Oak with some fruitwood with brisket, Hickory with some fruitwood for Butts.
    Chicken gets Pear wood or Cherry. Turkey, Pear with some Plum wood.

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