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Thread: Lookin' for a little help...

  1. #31
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    I suppose wet wood would work if you wanted to put out the fire......................
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
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  2. #32
    I thought the same thing, what I have seen on the Food Network, was to mix wet with dry wood. Mostly in a gas grill. In a charcoal grill, how long is the smoke cycle?


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  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by PierreRodrigue View Post
    I thought the same thing, what I have seen on the Food Network, was to mix wet with dry wood. Mostly in a gas grill. In a charcoal grill, how long is the smoke cycle?
    I hate to say it-But,.... it depends on your cooker.
    On a stick burner, you are burning wood the entire time you are cooking so it never really stops. Generally the meat will no longer absorb nitrates (the pink smoke ring)after it reaches 165 degrees at the surface, so starting with cold meat and lower temps can be one strategy to accomplish a good smoke ring. It also depends on the meat, on pork ribs, in a stick burner your smoke ring can go straight through the meat and meet in the middle. Sorry if its not that clear cut.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    I hate to say it-But,.... it depends on your cooker.
    On a stick burner, you are burning wood the entire time you are cooking so it never really stops. Generally the meat will no longer absorb nitrates (the pink smoke ring)after it reaches 165 degrees at the surface, so starting with cold meat and lower temps can be one strategy to accomplish a good smoke ring. It also depends on the meat, on pork ribs, in a stick burner your smoke ring can go straight through the meat and meet in the middle. Sorry if its not that clear cut.
    Agreed. It really depends on a number of factors, including the size of the piece of wood you are using, the temperature, location of the wood with respect to the fire, age, etc. In my experience, a 2 cubic inch piece of wood at 250 to 275, off to the side of your heat source, will give you about a good 1 to 1 1/2 hour of smoke. A small handful of wood chips will give you maybe 15 minutes of smoke when put directly on the heat source. Again, this is all based on my experience with a 22.5 Weber Performer.

    Here are my wood/meat combinations: Mostly peach, some hickory for pork (apple/cherry with hickory also works well); peach for chicken; mostly oak and some hickory for beef; apple for salmon.
    Michael
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  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by PierreRodrigue View Post
    In the smokeing stage of the process, is there any benifit or advantage in useing wet woodchips over dry, or even in conjunction with? Is there a wood that accentuates the meat better, whether beef or pork? What duration of smoke do you guys like to use?
    The duration of smoke depends on how much smoke flavor you like in your food. That being said, for thicker pieces of meat, e.g. pork butts or shoulder, I think you can burn wood the entire cooking process - the smoke may not continue to create a deeper smoke ring, but the smoke will continue to penetrate the meat. I use 2 inch thick pieces of wood sliced (4 inch diameter) every few hours to keep a steady stream of wood going. For ribs and chicken, I've found that less is more; continuous smoke can overwhelm the flavor of the meat. I start off with a standard size chunk of wood, then gradually reduce the amount of wood I use. Chicken can taste acrid if you use too much smoke.

    But try varying the amount of wood you use the first few times. I think you'll quickly get an idea as to how much smoke you like in your food. Also, as I've cooked over the years, I've definitely reduced the amount of wood I use.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  6. #36
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    My cooker is well known as a moist one, but I add a pan with hot water just in front of the heat inlet. If I am using the weber kettle I will use a drip tray(foil pan) with water in it to catch the mess,add moisture and also hold the coals off to one side of the grill. It again comes down to experimenting and getting the most from your gear.
    These are my sentiments, exactly! I use a Weber Kettle Grill and get outstanding results. I've stuck with my Weber for grilling, q'ing and smoking. It's all about learning your grill/Q!
    I stick with oak for smoking, because it is such a neutral smoke flavor and aroma...it works with most anything.
    Maybe I'm a weirdo, but I also have an oven thermometer in my grill to get the right temp. Once it's there, you only have to peek at it every now and then, assuming you have your coals nicely piled.
    For ribs, I go indirect for about an hour and a half, wrapped with aromatics and a spice paste for another hour or hour and a half, indrect to build more bark, direct (membrane down) to finish while painting on my sauce.
    Chicken depends on whether or not I'm using the hand cranked rotisserie euro grill, or my weber. Either way, I cook with the smoke. And use huge amounts of homemade piri piri sauce.
    Still trying to get brisket figured out, since it's not very common around here. It's getting close!
    Good luck Pierre! Have fun
    Still working on my brisket technique.
    09/06

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  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    Thanks Kyle for the info. Sorry to bring this up again, but do you know where you guys bought it? Is there a California dealer that has them? I'd like to personally take a look at a new one.

    Thanks again.
    Michael,

    Sorry I missed this question twice! We ordered it straight from Cookshack. I'm sure if you get in touch with them they can connect you to a dealer than has one in stock. It's a great cooker. I used it last night for a stuffed pork loin. I did all the prep work Sunday night and last night I was able to just throw it on the smoker for a couple hours. I didn't have to stress about temperature control after a long day at work and I still got my smoked meat fix! Highly recommended.

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle View Post
    Michael,

    Sorry I missed this question twice! We ordered it straight from Cookshack. I'm sure if you get in touch with them they can connect you to a dealer than has one in stock. It's a great cooker. I used it last night for a stuffed pork loin. I did all the prep work Sunday night and last night I was able to just throw it on the smoker for a couple hours. I didn't have to stress about temperature control after a long day at work and I still got my smoked meat fix! Highly recommended.
    Thanks Kyle. I saw that Cookshack has reduced shipping (another reason to buy it versus other cookers).

    I also recalled that they had cooking classes that you could apply the cost to buy a new cooker. I didn't see it the last time I went on the website but would consider taking the class before buying to learn more tricks to tailor the cooker to get the results I want.

    Nonetheless, thanks for all of the responses. I really appreciate it. It helped me get a much better idea of what it can and cannot do.

    I really have to decide what I want to buy now. Barbecue season is here!
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    Thanks Kyle. I saw that Cookshack has reduced shipping (another reason to buy it versus other cookers).

    I also recalled that they had cooking classes that you could apply the cost to buy a new cooker. I didn't see it the last time I went on the website but would consider taking the class before buying to learn more tricks to tailor the cooker to get the results I want.

    Nonetheless, thanks for all of the responses. I really appreciate it. It helped me get a much better idea of what it can and cannot do.

    I really have to decide what I want to buy now. Barbecue season is here!
    Are you still choosing between the Komodo and the Cookshack? If those are your choices go Cookshack. It has enough room to feed a party or cater but it's efficient enough to fire it up for a rack of ribs for the family. I'm sure the Komodo Kamado is a beautiful work of art, but I don't see how it's worth the $2000+ difference over a BGE. If you have other choices in mind then that changes things.

    Good luck!

  10. #40
    Smoking Meat Forum has directions for smoking brisket that's worked for years. As you see above there are many variations to doing a brisket as there are doing butts and ribs.

    Trim brisket and apply rub and let sit for an hour or longer.

    Use wood chips of choice. Soaking chips makes no difference, IMO nor does using a water pan (which I use in my cheap electric Brinkman).

    Smoke brisket to 170 deg.

    Wrap in foil with a good splash of your spray/mop-back into the smoker until it reaches 190 deg.

    Wrap in several old towels and place into a blanket lined cooler for a couple of hours to rest and redistribute the juices then slice or pull and serve.

    Keep in mind that a piece of meat this size will hit a plateau and you'll think your thermo has gone south on you. DO NOT adjust your heat, Just leave it alone-It's is during this time that the heat that has built up in the muscle mass begins to break down the connective tissue which in turn will make the brisket tender. Be patient with it and it will reward you a great meal.

    Also, brisket is much more finicky than pork butt, which is pretty hard to ruin.

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