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  1. #161
    Only lard I could find locally was in a supermercado (sp?)...but it was produced by armour/conagra and maybe it is just crap. When applying it seemed to work fine and I did try to layer it as lightly as possible so will just keep cooking more pork

    If given the option, I think I would probably trust Farmer John's more than Conagra

    Thanks for tips

  2. #162
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    I used lard that I got from my local co-op. Don't know how it was made, but it did seem to be very pure (very bright white and even).

    I used peanut oil first (put a good 1/4 inch or so in the pan, heated it to just below smoke point, and let it sit). After that I emptied the oil and wiped down the pan. This does not create any color at all, but it does leave a very fine layer of the oil in the surface of the pan.

    Then I used the lard: put a little in, wipe around, let smoke, wipe some more...

    The oil seemed to form a really nice primer or base for which the lard to bind.

    I got the most even and durable patina that I've ever achieved. Zero flaking or chipping and it even seems pretty tolerant of wet and acidic ingredients.

  3. #163
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    The typical supermarket lard like armour is hydrogenated. I would stay away from these products like the plague, they taste bad and are bad for you. Your local Hungarian butcher or farmer has the good stuff. It's easy to make your own lard by rendering it from fat back or in a pinch pork belly.

  4. #164
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    I don't know if anyone else has experienced this but when I've used commercial lard (Farmer John's here in CA), I've been able to get a much more consistent film and patina than using homemade lard. This last time, I used lard from a Mexican meat market (rendered from making chicharones). It didn't leave as consistent a film/patina. Maybe all that hydrogenated fat is good for something after all.
    ditto on Farmer John's lard got mine at stater bros market. I had them help me find it. It was by the vegetable oil. The boxes all said Manteca facing out. Only said lard on top.

  5. #165
    much more awesomer
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    I'm not obsessing (LOL) but I love experimenting. The pure lard seems to be working well, but it's still not as even or smooth as I'd like, and is not "non-stick" by any known definition of the expression. I still have to use a fair amount of fat to have any release at all, about the same amount I'd use in any other pan. I'm going to try Justin's combo method next -- start the instructed way, then build up the coat with natural lard.
    Francesco
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  6. #166
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SameGuy View Post
    I'm not obsessing (LOL) but I love experimenting. The pure lard seems to be working well, but it's still not as even or smooth as I'd like, and is not "non-stick" by any known definition of the expression. I still have to use a fair amount of fat to have any release at all, about the same amount I'd use in any other pan. I'm going to try Justin's combo method next -- start the instructed way, then build up the coat with natural lard.
    Btw I was obsessing. I think it just takes time. I have made steaks, scrambled eggs, etc. I use my Big green egg so much my inside kitchen hasn't been seeing much action lately. Good luck.

  7. #167
    much more awesomer
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    Small heads-up that Amazon has the 10.2-inch Mineral B frying pan on sale right now for $42.77, down from $60.
    Francesco
    Unskilled flunky

  8. #168
    Senior Member Shinob1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SameGuy View Post
    Small heads-up that Amazon has the 10.2-inch Mineral B frying pan on sale right now for $42.77, down from $60.
    Nice find; I have some friends that I am trying to convince to use cast-iron or carbon steel so I sent them a link. I have the 12.6 and love it.

  9. #169
    Senior Member mpukas's Avatar
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    reminder - La Cuisine is having their 20% off summer sale through the end of August. Coupon code - SUMMER2012. They charge 10% for shipping, so in the end you only really save 10%. I'm still eyeing the pancake pans w/ cast handles...

    BTW - I haven't even seasoned my new carbon pans w/ cast handles. Just threw on the stove and started whacking away at them. Simply awesome! I'm not fussy about building up a seasoning and maintaining it. I have no problems with these things sticking. For me it's more about heat management - making sure the pan is hot enough before cooking, but not too hot to burn - and using enough oil.
    Shibui - simplicity devoid of unnecessary elements

  10. #170
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    Mom's got a reasonably good patina going on her 12" crepe pan. The first few palacsinta stuck quite badly but after that it eased up. She uses a fair amount of oil to make them (usually canola or safflower) so it was self-seasoning right away.

    Today I had the extra time (and nice weather) to get the little 7.9" fry pan cleaned up (again, this time using Comet as I seem to have left the BKF at mom's... boy does BKF work better than regular scouring powder!). I did the "1 cm" oil thing outside on my Weber's "sauce burner" then proceeded to use the wiped lard trick. All I can say is I wish I had a gas stove indoors. So easy! Even though the sauce burner has a tough time at low settings -- I have yet to be able to maintain a gentle simmer on it -- it was dead easy to smoke off thin layers of lard until I had a deep, dark coating on the main surface of the pan. It took about 20 passes to get a nice, even -- and dark -- seasoning going. It now looks like freshly-tempered dark chocolate, satiny and smooth. Omelet for breakfast tomorrow!
    Francesco
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