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Thread: De Buyer Pans

  1. #81
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpukas View Post
    The12" - 32cm are big and HEAVY, especially w/ the cast handles. They measure just under 12" across the top from outside edge to outside edge. One thing to keep in mind about these pans, though, is because the side are sloped and they are fairly deep, the cooking surface area is smaller. The 36cm pans are probably about 13-1/2" across the top. I'd love to have one for the occasion when I sear something really big, like two turkey breast halves at once, but for the most part the 32cm suites me just fine. I can do two lamb racks at once.

    The 24cm is a bit small for me, but it's nice for things like breakfast for myself when I cook a single sausage, etc. I find it too small for eggs, omelettes, etc. That's where the 28cm come in. Perfect size for omelettes, searing a couple of steaks, chicken breasts, fish fillets, etc.

    I have a ScanPan 12" that has low side walls that are very vertical and I use that often just because of the large cooking surface.

    Thanks for your opinions. I will probably just get the 32cm mineral and a 9.44 in blue steel crepe pan. I really appreciate your help. I have a 12 inch nonstick as well.

  2. #82
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    How did they get that black with one seasoning (following the instructions)?
    Francesco
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  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by SameGuy View Post
    How did they get that black with one seasoning (following the instructions)?
    I did not season using the method in the intructions.

    How I season a pan: clean first, allow to evenly heat, smear a wad of paper towel in lard, wipe a very thin layer of lard into the hot pan (it needs to be a very thin layer). The thin layer should smoke quickly, when the smoke thins/stops repeat the thin layer of lard, do this until you have a desired even dark coating in the pan. When the pan has cooled some I add another layer and allow it to fully cool, then use the pan as much as possible.

  4. #84
    I use welding gloves for hot pots and pans in the oven or stove top. http://www.sears.com/shc/s/search_10...lding%20gloves

    I got the cheap blue ones that do okay.
    "Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough." —Mark Twain

  5. #85
    Senior Member mpukas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlassEye View Post
    I did not season using the method in the intructions.

    How I season a pan: clean first, allow to evenly heat, smear a wad of paper towel in lard, wipe a very thin layer of lard into the hot pan (it needs to be a very thin layer). The thin layer should smoke quickly, when the smoke thins/stops repeat the thin layer of lard, do this until you have a desired even dark coating in the pan. When the pan has cooled some I add another layer and allow it to fully cool, then use the pan as much as possible.
    That's a great technique! Prolly the best one I have heard of. Have you used other oils/fats, or is lard best? Never tried lard for seasoning... my experience w/ bacon fat is it's got a low smoke point and burns easily, so I don't cook with it much. But maybe that why it's so good for seaosning pans???

    A while ago now (and I've mentioned it before) Cook's Illustrated ran an article about a reader who seasoned her cast iron pans w/ flax seed oil. Wipe a thin film in the pan, put it in a 500 oven for an hour, then turn it off until it cools. Repeat 5-6 times. Something about the molecules of flax seed oil being different that other oils. I tried it when I first got my De Buer carbon pans - the finish looked great, but as soon as I used it, it flaked off. I talked to one of the Cuisinettes (how can you not love some lovely southern gals who call themselves that???), and she tried it as well with the same results I had. Bottom line - that technique doesn't work on carbon pans.

    I'll stick to the method you described, or go the real man route like the chinese chef seasoning a wok. Which is actually quite similar to what you are doing... thanks for that!
    Shibui - simplicity devoid of unnecessary elements

  6. #86
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mano View Post
    I use welding gloves for hot pots and pans in the oven or stove top. http://www.sears.com/shc/s/search_10...lding%20gloves

    I got the cheap blue ones that do okay.
    Yep. Got to have a plan. I use cheap white IKEA towels. I buy ten at a time. nackten guest towels 49 cents each. I use them for hot pans and wiping my knives.

    http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/50215084/

  7. #87
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    I use bar mop towels for knives because they are absorbent and cheap -- I inevitably catch the heel in the weave or pile loops. I use long terry oven mitts or gloves for the oven, and any rag I have near me for pans.
    Francesco
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  8. #88
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    I think I'm going to start over with my carbons, though, using GlassEye's method. The way I did it (the instructions, using grape seed oil) seemed to work, but I'm noticing uneven spots and the coating doesn't seem to be building up.
    Francesco
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  9. #89
    Senior Member mpukas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SameGuy View Post
    I think I'm going to start over with my carbons, though, using GlassEye's method. The way I did it (the instructions, using grape seed oil) seemed to work, but I'm noticing uneven spots and the coating doesn't seem to be building up.
    Grape seed oil is weird stuff to me. I use it to cook high heat and for dressing, mayonaise, etc. What I find wierd is it gets gunky/gummy. I was gonna use it for seaosning too, but I'm not sure about it. Maybe pig fat is THE way to go here.
    Shibui - simplicity devoid of unnecessary elements

  10. #90
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    I bought lard the same day I restocked the grape seed, so with just a thin coat of seasoning (one seasoning session and a few batches of sausage links) it'll be pretty easy to BKF it off.
    Francesco
    Unskilled flunky

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