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Thread: De Buyer Pans

  1. #111
    Senior Member wenus2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    curious about the potato skins...
    That was the directions included from the manufacturer with my pan: boil skins of a potato for 15 min or so.
    I believed it to be for the purpose of removing the factory coating on the pan.

    Also, for seasoning, this crap flat works and is idiot proof...
    http://www.amazon.com/Camp-Chef-CSC-...pr_product_top
    -Enjoy the ride. *** All statements made herein are my personal opinion and nothing more, regardless of tone or context. ***

  2. #112
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deckhand View Post
    I would like to try out a cast iron handle sometime. Not sure how you are gripping. I noticed on my mineral b 12" the handle very conveniently goes underneath my arm and supports the pan when I choke up on the handle towards the skillet. I like that my arm supports the pan rather than just my hand.
    Hmmm...tried it on my 9". I can see where that would work better on a larger pan. Now I might have to try one...
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  3. #113
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post
    Hmmm...tried it on my 9". I can see where that would work better on a larger pan. Now I might have to try one...

  4. #114
    I just saw this this morning.

    https://opensky.com/doriegreenspan/p...und-frypan-set

    I picked this set up because I had a $10 credit on Opensky. It's a little more than Capital City but these look like the real deal Mineral B pans.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  5. #115
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    Nice! Thanks for the heads-up.

  6. #116
    much more awesomer
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    $125 for all three is pretty good, actually. (+$10 credit -$10 "handling" charge).
    Francesco
    Unskilled flunky

  7. #117
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    Thanks, I am all over it

  8. #118
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SameGuy View Post
    Not sure I'm doing it right. No, I'm not "obsessive about seasoning" as someone mentioned in the carbon seasoning thread, but I first fried up some bacon this morning. The bacon slid around nicely, but when I tried to wipe the excess grease before the eggs I noticed quite a bit of sticky crud. Added some oil and fried up two eggs. They stuck quite badly, but I finally managed to get them out without destroying them. I prefer over-easy, but that would've been impossible. There were lots of proteins stuck in the pan, and it took lots of hot water to start loosening. My pan-dedicated nylon brush did nothing so I resorted to a well-used "green sponge" (De Buyer's term for a 3M ScotchBrite?) which did the trick with some effort. But now it looks like the pan has a very pretty blue patina, but the seasoning appears to be gone. Attempt number three?
    As others have mentioned, the sugars from the bacon will often lead to little bits sticking, but it shouldn't be big deal. I created a pretty solid, flake-free patina on my pan using a combo of the peanut oil soak method and then the lard & paper towel wipe method and I still get little sugary-sticky pits of bacon goo stuck after I'm done cooking bacon.
    Here's what i do:
    -with all of the bacon out of the pan, but the bacon grease still in the pan, adjust the heat so that you're just below the smoke point of the bacon grease.

    -use your metal spatula like a paint scraper to remove all of the burnt / gooey / sticky bits. A narrow and flexible one works best for getting into corners and around the sides.
    I like this one:
    Name:  314G9S9ZJ4L._SL500_AA300_.jpg
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    http://www.amazon.com/Global-GS-25-S...global+spatula - I actually sharpened the leading edge like a chisel and flattened the underside -it does a really great job of getting under the gunk. Removing a few scrapes of seasoning here and there is not a big deal. The key to making / keeping a good seasoning is to keep it thin and smooth. Thick, chunky bits will flake like a bad paint-job.

    - I have found that having the hot grease in the pan makes removing stuck-on stuff much easier than with water.

    -once you have liberated all of the gunk, dump the grease out (or reserve it for use later)

    -wad up a small bit (maybe 1/4 sheet) of paper towel and wipe around the pan. This will help to remove the last little flakes of burnt stuff and also spread a thin / even layer of grease.

    - for extra anti-stick / to repair the scratches left from your spatula, you can add back in a little oil or bacon grease and wipe again with the paper towel wad.

    -The surface of the pan should look shinny/glossy and smooth, not dull and smoking (again, too much smoke= too much heat).

    The pan is ready for eggs. (you will probably want to turn the heat back up a little bit to help the pan recover from the raw eggs pulling the heat out). Adding just a pinch of butter or a little of the bacon grease will even further increase the non-stick (and add flavor).

    I would say that the biggest learning curve with these pans is heat management and realizing that you don't actually need that much. Electric burners are always a PITA and add to the "challenge." I really miss cooking with fire...

  9. #119
    much more awesomer
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    Thanks!

    My mom just said she picked up some real lard from the local Polish delicatessen, so I'll clean up and re-season her pans with that -- I used grapeseed on hers too, before I cleaned mine and switched to Snow Cap (hydrogenated​) lard.
    Francesco
    Unskilled flunky

  10. #120
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin0505 View Post
    ...I created a pretty solid, flake-free patina on my pan using a combo of the peanut oil soak method and then the lard & paper towel wipe method and I still get little sugary-sticky pits of bacon goo stuck after I'm done cooking bacon.
    Could you explain the peanut oil soak method?

    Thanks and Cheers!

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