Quantcast
MEAT COOKING: Grill vs. Plancha vs. Range Top
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25

Thread: MEAT COOKING: Grill vs. Plancha vs. Range Top

  1. #1

    MEAT COOKING: Grill vs. Plancha vs. Range Top

    I've seen many different types of kitchen where the general cookery of meats is done on a grill, on a plancha or on a range top burner in a pan (either a heavy bottomed pan or a general saute pan). Most traditional lines that I've seen use a grill, newer and more upscale restaurants seem to use planchas (going with that new fad of supposedly flat tops giving the best sear) and good French and Italian kitchens seem to cook their meats on the range top (hence their "saute" cooks are usually quite skilled since they do most of the cooking).

    Each method has their pro's and cons and I like them all for different reasons. People love the taste of a traditional grill and those diamond grill marks, although they are very hot and can be a PITA to clean depending on what model or how old your grill is. Plus grill heavy restaurants are always looking for grill cooks since they get burned out faster. Planchas give that distinctive flat top sear and are versatile in that different things can be cooked on the same station (IE you can cook buttered buns and burgers on different sections and can also do a faux saute of sorts for things like shrimp and certain veggies) but people tend to over rely on the plancha and sometimes foods will taste different if the oil or juices from different sections run off into each other (I've had a burger taste faintly of seafood one time). Range tops give a good sear and are good for finishing a steak or other piece of meat with butter (glorious!) and can have the added benefit of finishing cooking in the oven (especially helpful for large pieces of meat, bone in stuff and duck breasts). However, they are harder to get meat temperatures right since your saute cooks are doing a lot at one time and getting the right sear is more difficult hence sometimes over-seared or under seared meats.


    If you were opening a restaurant from scratch which one of these methods would you use for meat cookery and why?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Honolulu, HI
    Posts
    966
    I think you need all three because together you have versatility.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    wyoming, closer to nowhere than somewhere.
    Posts
    3,502
    All 3 are considered when opening, and usually are used too. Don't forget about deep frying either. You can cook just about anything in a deep fryer.

  4. #4
    I'm talking about specifically cooking meats tender enough to use a dry heat method like steaks, burgers, chicken breasts etc. You certainly wouldnt use a deep fryer nor would you use all 3 methods. You wouldnt cook steaks on a plancha then burgers on a grill and lamb chops on a range top in the same kitchen.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Costa Mesa California
    Posts
    1,738
    If I was investing in a restaurant I would experiment with methods to find out which one would fit my style best before making a big investment. I would probably try sous vide with grilling. Perfect doneness and more tender with aesthetic grill marks. Probably wood charcoal for additional flavoring. As previously mentioned by you a good pan sear with butter is also quite tasty, but I prefer a little smoke flavor and grill marks and can melt butter on it when I do that. Only you know what will make you proud and happy to serve for the style of restaurant you are trying to create.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Top of Georgia
    Posts
    1,218
    I had to look up plancha. Flat top, got it. It depends on what kind of restaurant.

    I cook burgers on the charbroiler (what you are calling grill I think) then move them to the flat top (what you are calling plancha I think) to melt the cheese. Chopped steak I start on the charbroiler and finish in the oven. Range top I only do things in pots: soups, caramelized onions, etc. Almost every order gets a deep fried something as a side. I am working on a deep fried cheese burger by the way.

    I don't think you can seriously open any restaurant without all 3 + a deep fryer + an oven.

    -AJ

  7. #7
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,090
    Quote Originally Posted by ams View Post
    I'm talking about specifically cooking meats tender enough to use a dry heat method like steaks, burgers, chicken breasts etc. You certainly wouldnt use a deep fryer nor would you use all 3 methods. You wouldnt cook steaks on a plancha then burgers on a grill and lamb chops on a range top in the same kitchen.
    Deep frying is a dry heat method of cooking. And if I was opening a restaurant, I would most definately have all three at my disposal. Forced to choose, I'd take a row of gas burners over anything else though.

  8. #8
    The alleles created by mutation may be beneficial


    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Hampton Roads, VA
    Posts
    1,872
    Quote Originally Posted by ams View Post
    I'm talking about specifically cooking meats tender enough to use a dry heat method like steaks, burgers, chicken breasts etc. You certainly wouldnt use a deep fryer nor would you use all 3 methods. You wouldnt cook steaks on a plancha then burgers on a grill and lamb chops on a range top in the same kitchen.
    I don't see why you wouldn't. I would probably go with a range if I had to choose one, assuming you also get an oven with the range. You can cook pretty much anything in a pan, not true for a grill. I could see a flat top being useful but messy.
    Grill marks are nice but a butter crust is better.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Costa Mesa California
    Posts
    1,738
    On a more serious note. A long long time ago when I worked in kitchens. We had the basics, range,grill,fryers,ovens. Walk in refrigerator and freezer. Other things are nice if you have the budget, but better have the necessary stuff. My real recommendation is pm guys like Salty,Chef Niloc, sachem"son",tkern,johnny chance,etc. and ask for their advice. Certainly, not trying to slight anyone not on this list, or the thread poster.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    wyoming, closer to nowhere than somewhere.
    Posts
    3,502
    You can get flat top, and grills for over the top of burners too. I have never priced them, but have used them a few times. What it comes down to is what are you wanting to serve? Then go from there. If you are only wanting 1 then oven and burners.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •