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Thread: Japanese chefs NOT using pinch-grip

  1. #21
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    A tight grip with a vegetable cleaver, will cause your arm to ache after 10 or 15 minutes. A cleaver is all about guiding the weight, not trying to control it.

    What I've learned from a cleaver, using a light grip, guiding the knife, instead of trying to control it, has carried over to other types of knives.

    Jay

  2. #22
    I do the finger on the spine thing about 80% of the time. I just find it more comfortable.

  3. #23
    The "pointing grip" with the finger on the spine is the grip for slicing. Note in the photo at the top of this thread that the salmon is being sliced - that is, the knife is being drawn towards the body. Pinch grip is used for push cutting - that is, when the knife is moving forward, away from the body (and also downward). Other grips are used for when the food is held in the hand, off the board.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frege View Post
    The "pointing grip" with the finger on the spine is the grip for slicing. Note in the photo at the top of this thread that the salmon is being sliced - that is, the knife is being drawn towards the body. Pinch grip is used for push cutting - that is, when the knife is moving forward, away from the body (and also downward). Other grips are used for when the food is held in the hand, off the board.
    I think you drastically over generalizing here...there aren't any set rules to cutting that I've ever seen, as each person has a different technique.

    I NEVER use pinch grip since getting into Japanese knives. Even when push cutting, either have one finger on the spine or all on the handle.

    You might want to let him know he is breaking your "rules".

  5. #25
    Yes, but, CJ, aren't you mostly using a suji now? The blade height on most sujis I feel encourages using the "point" technique, as I find a pinch grip on narrow blades to be a little cumbersome. I still contend that for most typical uses of a gyuto the pinch grip is a superior grip.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UglyJoe View Post
    Yes, but, CJ, aren't you mostly using a suji now? The blade height on most sujis I feel encourages using the "point" technique, as I find a pinch grip on narrow blades to be a little cumbersome. I still contend that for most typical uses of a gyuto the pinch grip is a superior grip.
    Yep, the suji is my every day knife and although I do agree with you that narrow blades encourage the point technique, when I grab my 270 or 240 gyutos I still never choke up on the blade to use them...the pinch grip for me has just disappeared over time since the switch from European knives.

    I'm not saying I am right and others are wrong...just that I have realized through my experience that these light grips further back on the handle allow better use of the blade's own leverage for Japanese knives.

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