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Thread: Removing thinning scratches

  1. #1

    Removing thinning scratches

    Hey,

    i have a friend that sharpened his knife, he thinned it and both whole sides look pretty bad was wondering if there is a way to fix this without sandpaper or a beltgrinder?

    i was wondering if the mud from stones would help smooth out the finish?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Using actual stones to refinish an entire blade isn't fun and I've never gotten a nice, even finish that way. Applying mud to some sort of substrate like cork has worked for me to an extent.

  3. #3
    Good topic, I wondered about this too. Wonder if anyone has pics of a knife thinned on a stone.
    I'm assuming it's part of the learning process. (Not to thin using too rough of a grit)
    Am I the only one who searched for The Edge from U2 and ended up here?

  4. #4
    Pabloz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgraeff View Post
    Hey,

    was wondering if there is a way to fix this without sandpaper or a beltgrinder?
    Is there a particular reason for not using sandpaper?

  5. #5
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    wet/dry sandpaper is the way to go, in my opinion. i've gotten good results using a King 800, as well. refinishing goes along with thinning, so a small investment in sandpaper is a good idea.

  6. #6
    The alleles created by mutation may be beneficial


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    A friend, huh?
    I've never done a great job polishing a knife with stones only. Mud could work but it would take awhile. Is there any reason you don't want to use micro mesh pads or sandpaper?

  7. #7
    Mud on cork is pretty limited in terms of the depth of scratches it will fix.

    Putting a satin finish on using wet/dry sandpaper on a hard foam sanding block is not all that difficult. Lubricate with water/Dawn, sand in one direction only, start with 220 and finish around 400 or so, and you you can mimic a Shigefusa kasumi finish surprisingly well.

  8. #8
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    These are two knives I've thinned and blended on stones. You don't have to blend that far up the blade.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #9
    You know sandpaper is available at any auto body shop, or even Auto Zone for like $5, right? It's a rare solution--fast, cheap AND good.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew H View Post
    A friend, huh?
    I've never done a great job polishing a knife with stones only. Mud could work but it would take awhile. Is there any reason you don't want to use micro mesh pads or sandpaper?
    ya actually a guy a work that didn't want me to do it

    will try to get a picture tonight. Also if anyone has any videos of how to do it with sandpaper that would be awesome i did it about a year ago with my Kono HD it came out ok but not as good as id like you can always see the scratch marks

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