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Thread: Removing thinning scratches

  1. #11
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    The problem is you have to start with almost the grit that caused the deepest scratches; otherwise all further effort will be in vain.

  2. #12
    You can do it with stone[s].

    But it will train you patience.

  3. #13
    Quality automotive sandpaper is your answer. The reason sandpaper is better than stones is that with a flexible backing (like rubber), your sanding block will conform to a blade's shape, particularly to that of a convex.

    Here are some tips that would make your work easier.

    You want to remove the handle (if you have a wa) if possible. You want to fix your knife on a block of wood so it is stationary. You want to have a sanding stick that you can hold with two hands. Typically 12" long, 2" wide board with a glued piece of thick rubber gasket or leather in the middle would do. All this is going to give you a fairly good finishing result.

    You will have to remove all scratches, not just sharpening scratches, to have a good finish. Many knives are finished with vertical scratches and Scotch-Brited over, so there might be deep scratches hidden under finish. Start with 220 and sand until you get rid of all scratches. Then move on 320, 400, 600, 800. I don't see any practical reason to go above 800 grit. Use Windex as lubricant.

    Use back and forth sanding motion. When you get to the 800, your motion should be in one direction only. That will apply even final finishing scratches. Finally, go to the stones and put a thin bevel on your knife.

    M


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  4. #14
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    The "Marko method" is certainly the most uncompromising and through way to do it (big surprise).

    But Ive also had very good results with a cheap neoprene&cloth mousepad.

    -put mouse pad on table or countertop (work surface) with one side touching or slightly overhanging the edge of the work surface.

    -put sandpaper over top of mousepad.

    -put blade ontop of sandpaper so that handle is hanging out over the edge of work surface

    - apply glentle downward pressure to blade (BUT DO NOT PRESS ON THE HANDLE UNLESS YOU WANT TO BEND/BREAK IT OFF)

    -move blade "in and out" from tip to heel; heel to tip

  5. #15
    Not done knives but have done with numerous other tools and another vote for wet and dry.

  6. #16
    I think most knives will have to be thinned sooner or later, so refinishing process has to be thought out as well.

    I use a drill wise ($20) with a 2x2x18" or so block of wood in it. You can bolt your wise to a table top, so it is stationary. I use another block of wood on top of the one in the vise. I clamp in a top one to the bottom one as well as a knife's tang with a C-clamp. You can also us a bracket and a little wedge, similar to how Maxim secures his knives. For that matter, you can skip a vise all together.

    Why two blocks? I like the height and I like the fact that I can rotate the top block slightly to the left or right (while the bottom is stationary) to change angle of scratch lines.

    If a handle is fixed on a knife, you can carve a recess in the top block to 'sink' the handle in and to clamp it.

    Simple, but very effective setup. It has worked for me very well.
    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  7. #17
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    99Limited's Avatar
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    You all don't know how glad I am that this topic was brought up. I thinned or tried to thin or maybe just wasted a whole lot of my time on my A-type a year ago. After I was finished I decided to polish the blade face. I ended up with a shiny blade with a few blemishes I couldn't get out without starting over. I just stuck the knife back into its saya and stuck in in the bottom of my knife drawer. I think this is a good a time as any to get that knife back out and have another go at it.

  8. #18
    Thanks for the step by step Marko. Will be stopping by the auto parts store for some sand paper after work.
    Am I the only one who searched for The Edge from U2 and ended up here?

  9. #19
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgraeff View Post
    ya actually a guy a work that didn't want me to do it

    will try to get a picture tonight. Also if anyone has any videos of how to do it with sandpaper that would be awesome i did it about a year ago with my Kono HD it came out ok but not as good as id like you can always see the scratch marks
    Quote Originally Posted by 99Limited View Post
    You all don't know how glad I am that this topic was brought up. I thinned or tried to thin or maybe just wasted a whole lot of my time on my A-type a year ago. After I was finished I decided to polish the blade face. I ended up with a shiny blade with a few blemishes I couldn't get out without starting over. I just stuck the knife back into its saya and stuck in in the bottom of my knife drawer. I think this is a good a time as any to get that knife back out and have another go at it.
    im glad i read this post as well. ive been Starting with 800 grit auto sand paper! haha no wonder all my scratches remain

  10. #20
    Pabloz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    I think most knives will have to be thinned sooner or later, so refinishing process has to be thought out as well.

    I use a drill wise ($20) with a 2x2x18" or so block of wood in it. You can bolt your wise to a table top, so it is stationary. I use another block of wood on top of the one in the vise. I clamp in a top one to the bottom one as well as a knife's tang with a C-clamp. You can also us a bracket and a little wedge, similar to how Maxim secures his knives. For that matter, you can skip a vise all together.

    Why two blocks? I like the height and I like the fact that I can rotate the top block slightly to the left or right (while the bottom is stationary) to change angle of scratch lines.

    If a handle is fixed on a knife, you can carve a recess in the top block to 'sink' the handle in and to clamp it.

    Simple, but very effective setup. It has worked for me very well.
    M
    Pictures please.

    PZ

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