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Thread: Removing thinning scratches

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    The problem is you have to start with almost the grit that caused the deepest scratches; otherwise all further effort will be in vain.
    You can take out 60 grit scratch with 220 grip paper, but you will have to put some time (and paper) into it.

    Pabloz, will take some next time I have my camera in the shop.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

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  2. #22
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin0505 View Post
    The "Marko method" is certainly the most uncompromising and through way to do it (big surprise).

    But Ive also had very good results with a cheap neoprene&cloth mousepad.

    -put mouse pad on table or countertop (work surface) with one side touching or slightly overhanging the edge of the work surface.

    -put sandpaper over top of mousepad.

    -put blade ontop of sandpaper so that handle is hanging out over the edge of work surface

    - apply glentle downward pressure to blade (BUT DO NOT PRESS ON THE HANDLE UNLESS YOU WANT TO BEND/BREAK IT OFF)

    -move blade "in and out" from tip to heel; heel to tip
    thats how i do it, though i only move the knife from heel to tip. the results are pretty good, in my opinion.

  3. #23
    Pabloz's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=
    Pabloz, will take some next time I have my camera in the shop.

    M[/QUOTE]
    Thanks.....just thought it might help some that have never done it.

    PZ

  4. #24
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    I have a 12 inch square piece of rubber that I got from McMaster-Carr that sits on the bench top, and the sandpaper sits on that after a sprit with water. I can then work to blade on that surface as needed to achieve my desired effect. A little water under and over the paper does the trick!
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  5. #25
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    I have a 12 inch square piece of rubber that I got from McMaster-Carr that sits on the bench top, and the sandpaper sits on that after a sprit with water. I can then work to blade on that surface as needed to achieve my desired effect. A little water under and over the paper does the trick!
    The drops of water are very clear to me, the squared inches
    though required some thinking.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    I am so glad this topic is here. I don't have a problem with my blades having scratches, but when I did my bosses I was a little ashamed of them. He liked the over all look and feel but I was mad it wasn't perfect/like new.

    Now to go and do some more learning.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post

    You will have to remove all scratches, not just sharpening scratches, to have a good finish. Many knives are finished with vertical scratches and Scotch-Brited over, so there might be deep scratches hidden under finish. Start with 220 and sand until you get rid of all scratches. Then move on 320, 400, 600, 800. I don't see any practical reason to go above 800 grit. Use Windex as lubricant.

    Use back and forth sanding motion. When you get to the 800, your motion should be in one direction only. That will apply even final finishing scratches. Finally, go to the stones and put a thin bevel on your knife.

    M
    Is 800 grit high enough for a mirror polish?

    Thanks

  8. #28
    The alleles created by mutation may be beneficial


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    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    Is 800 grit high enough for a mirror polish?

    Thanks
    What finish is left largely depends on what sandpaper brand you use. Some leave much finer finishes than others, but I don't think any 800 grit paper will leave a mirror finish.

  9. #29
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    Is 800 grit high enough for a mirror polish?

    Thanks
    eventually.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    Is 800 grit high enough for a mirror polish?

    Thanks
    Not in a true sense (like a mirror), but you can see your reflection, particularly if you oil your knife.

    800 you will get fine satin finish, provided you put down a nice foundation with preceding grits.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

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