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Thread: How much flex acceptable in a laser?

  1. #11
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    Yeh most of my cuts are forward push or chop cuts,almost never rock a gyuto.I like em thin for most prep jobs,it's my experience that thin blades glide through food better speeding up prep time.

  2. #12
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    it should really have ZERO flex...

  3. #13
    rhygin's Avatar
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    Umm. Embarrassed to be the voice of disagreement. Really just my own opinion, but the Tad is worlds apart from other gyutos, but it's absolutely one of the favorites (mine is white steel, but I think it's comparable to the stainless version that is more common). I definitely won't say other people are wrong, but in my experience, I haven't tackled anything where the flex has become an issue.

    I guess there is some limit to acceptable flexibility, but I haven't hit it yet (which isn't to say that thicker knives are inferior).

  4. #14
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    Isn't the flex more a function of how you use the knife? Seems as if the knife will only 'flex' if you don't cut straight? Really just asking as I am in the market for a light (laser) gyuto myself and figured that any ultralight knife will flex just like the old filet knives, and as with those, if you make straight, clean cuts then there is no issue.

  5. #15

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    What is the advantage to flex then? If you could grind a knife that is a laser without much/any flex, why would you continue grinding until it did flex?

    Flex comes from starting with thin stock, so that you dont have to spend a lot of time grinding to get as thin as desired therefore saving money. It is just cheaper production wise. Some may claim there is no disadvantage to having a gyuto with flex, but there is no advantage either, so why have it if you can avoid it? I prefer stiffer knives and feel they are better than flexy knives, so I do see a disadvantage in flexible gyutos.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  6. #16
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    So which of the current ultralights have the most/least flex? I really think it is more difficult to sharpen a flexible knife, but hadn't considered so much the consequences of using one--used to think the other way around. Would either the Konosuke and Gesshin Ginga (white steel versions) be considered overly flexible, or one much more so than the other?

    Thanks

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    So which of the current ultralights have the most/least flex? I really think it is more difficult to sharpen a flexible knife, but hadn't considered so much the consequences of using one--used to think the other way around. Would either the Konosuke and Gesshin Ginga (white steel versions) be considered overly flexible, or one much more so than the other?

    Thanks
    I haven't really noticed any flex in my Gesshin Ginga; I have not tried to test the flex, but in use and sharpening it is not really noticeable.

  8. #18
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    None of the Ashi/IT/Suisin types are difficult to sharpen, in the least due to flexibility.

    For the record, EVERY knife flexes. The question is how much and if you feel it while you work with it.

  9. #19
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlassEye View Post
    I haven't really noticed any flex in my Gesshin Ginga; I have not tried to test the flex, but in use and sharpening it is not really noticeable.
    Thanks, this (GG) is actually the knife I plan on purchasing once the 240's are back in stock, though it does seem like a lot of people really like their Konosuke's.

    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    None of the Ashi/IT/Suisin types are difficult to sharpen, in the least due to flexibility.

    For the record, EVERY knife flexes. The question is how much and if you feel it while you work with it.
    Yes sir, hadn't really thought about it, but just went into the kitchen and even my big old Sab nogent and large cleaver will flex nicely near the tip.

  10. #20
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    If flex is a problem when sharpening the technique might need a look at. Brute force is not always the best approach.......
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

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