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Thread: Beginner looking for a chef's knife

  1. #11
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    If you want something a little flashy and you're ok with carbon steel, Misono Swedish Steel series with the engraved dragon would be a cool choice and an excellent knife. If you want something a more afforadable but still good value, the Fujiwara FKM series is stainless and a reliable choice. JCK Gekko (under Specials) offers some very affordable options if you have your eye on something damascus patterned. All can be bought from japanesechefsknife.com with a flat rate $7 shipping that is absurdly fast.

    Welcome and good luck on your search.

  2. #12

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    @Deckhand - ooooh shiny. They look nice and bang on budget.

    @Benuser - thanks, I definitely need sharpening advice too.

    @Dusty - Sunshine Coast, an hour north of Brisvegas

    @JasonD - I have no idea about the merits of carbon steel. Not sure I need a dragon tho! JapaneseChefsKnife looks awesome tho, thanks!!

  3. #13

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    Just looking at the eBay listings for Sakai gyuto knives - what's white steel?

    JapaneseChefsKnife is great for visuals, super hard to know what to look for, for a novice. Verbiage overload!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbrookes View Post
    Just looking at the eBay listings for Sakai gyuto knives - what's white steel?

    JapaneseChefsKnife is great for visuals, super hard to know what to look for, for a novice. Verbiage overload!
    Very good steel. If its from a reputable seller and decent maker then it should be great. Good edge holding, gets real sharp.
    One of my favourite japanese steels.

  5. #15
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    White steel is carbon steel though, so it will patina/rust if not treated properly...

  6. #16
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    White steel is a type of carbon steel made by the Japanese company hitachi. It is well known for its ability to take a very keen edge. Like all carbon steels it will patina with use and rust if not cared for properly. Carbon steels are sometimes favoured because of the edges they can take and the ease of sharpening. A search on this forum will yield plenty of results discussing the differences between stainless and carbon knives.

    The Sakai yusuke knives you are looking at from bluewayjapan are excellent, and very light and thin. For an everyday kind of knife, you may not need the 'ultra thin' model.

    Jck probably offers the best budget sub-150 dollar range.
    Fujiwara, carbonext, Hiromoto, are also worth looking at from that site.

    If you wanted an Aussie vendor, you could try chefsarmoury.com.au but they can be on the pricey side compared to Japanese vendors.

  7. #17
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    If you're unsure about a knife that will go rusty if you leave it in a sink, Sakai yusuke also make great stainless knives - usually described as 'Swedish stainless'.

  8. #18

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    I've just done a little reading - wiping the knife when switching foods and then a thorough hot-water & detergent hand-wash, followed by air-drying seems to be the recommendation for carbon steel. Is that correct?

    Additionally I've discovered I actually use a finger-point grip: thumb and middle finger behind the bolster (?) and index down the spine. Don't know where I picked that up, but apparently that's how I cut.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbrookes View Post
    I've just done a little reading - wiping the knife when switching foods and then a thorough hot-water & detergent hand-wash, followed by air-drying seems to be the recommendation for carbon steel. Is that correct?

    Additionally I've discovered I actually use a finger-point grip: thumb and middle finger behind the bolster (?) and index down the spine. Don't know where I picked that up, but apparently that's how I cut.
    Yup that's generally what I do when I use carbon. Keep a cloth handy for quick wipe downs in between foods or if you have to put something in the oven. Then once everything is all said and done wash with hot water and soap and dry immediately.

    Finger on the spine is a common grip for cutting, although it may not be the best kinesthetically. I use it a lot for tougher foods that need a bit of an extra push. I find with most foods and handles a simple pinch is the easiest.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm2hill View Post
    I use it a lot for tougher foods that need a bit of an extra push. I find with most foods and handles a simple pinch is the easiest.
    Funny, I use the "finger along the spine" thing almost always, especially with lighter/longer knives and precise cutting. I don't pull the finger back to a more "classic" pinch grip unless I'm really needing an extra push. Different strokes, lol.

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