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Primer on finishing on stones? (As opposed to paper)
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Thread: Primer on finishing on stones? (As opposed to paper)

  1. #1

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    Primer on finishing on stones? (As opposed to paper)

    I've been finishing my knives progressing through grits on paper. 120, 220, 320, 400. It gets me a good finish, but I still love the look of those hazy finished found on yanagis, etc.

    I don't know anything about that approach.

    Where do I begin?
    What should I be aware of?
    What's the technique? Same with paper? Knife on stone, or stone on knife?
    Slurries, naturals, synthetics, fingerstones, compounds...
    Advantages/disadvantages vs paper? Time, cost, etc.

    Please do note that I am completely new to this idea. I've only pretty much made knives the western way, keeping everything simple and straight-forward. Thanks!


    EDIT: This is wayyy down the road, but I've certainly seen some incredible contrasts between higane/jigane; is the process for bringing out a hamon similar (without etching).

  2. #2
    The alleles created by mutation may be beneficial

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    Are you talking about making a faux kasumi finish on a monosteel knife? You might want to look at this: http://www.suisin.co.jp/toku02/2009-01/index.htm

  3. #3
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    It is all about the natural stones.

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    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlassEye View Post
    It is all about the natural stones.
    nah, it's all about the King 800

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew H View Post
    Are you talking about making a faux kasumi finish on a monosteel knife? You might want to look at this: http://www.suisin.co.jp/toku02/2009-01/index.htm
    Do you mean kasumi as in that haze finish (I'm not so familiar with the terms)? What makes it a faux kasumi vs a normal one?

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    nah, it's about natural stoned!
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
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  7. #7
    The alleles created by mutation may be beneficial

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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Nguyen View Post
    Do you mean kasumi as in that haze finish (I'm not so familiar with the terms)? What makes it a faux kasumi vs a normal one?
    I think it would help if you posted a picture of the finish you want to replicate. A faux kasumi is made on monosteel knife instead of on a clad one.

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    I wasn't aware that a kasumi finish was exclusively for, I think, wrought iron (due to its nature when polishing, right?)?



    A different finish, but also one I'm interested in. I'm not particularly focused on the hamon/damascus right now, but it's just so clean and hazy.


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    It's about elbow grease. Quite easy to do with hamaguriba, and a larger bevel knifes like suisin inbox honyaki or my aritsugu a-type kiritsuke:



  10. #10

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    When the Japanese make a laminated blade, it has hard core steel, and mild steel cladding. The table of the blade is mild steel. The blade road is part mild steel, and part exposed core.

    When you sharpen it on a muddy JNat, you get a nice haze on the blade, displaying in a striking manner, the difference between the steels, which is a result of their different levels of ability to resist deformation.

    "Kasumi" means "Mist" in Japanese. It's the name of both the hazy finish and, very often, a general reference to the style of construction. Don't take my word as gospel on this, because I do not speak Japanese, but I'm pretty sure that the name for the construction of a laminated blade is "San Mai".

    You want a real Kasumi finish, you have to get a Jnat. I use fingerstones, because they are significantly cheaper and I don't get enough single-bevels to warrant paying for the $700 JNat that I want.

    You want to fake a Kasumi contrast on a monosteel blade, that's another topic. Few people in the world do that very well. I think it's a cool trick.

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