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Thread: J-Nat Club

  1. #1291
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    Not yet sadly, work has been busy the past week, but I'm going to try your suggestion when I do. Yeah, the okudo is very clean aside from the two slight depressions in the bottom left corner and has some light renge which didn't really come out in the photo.

  2. #1292
    Senior Member riba's Avatar
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    My very modest new stone, a Mizuhikara suita (from MM)

    .

    It is a budget stone (MAX 150mmx87mmx25mm), but I am pretty impressed with how quick it kicks up swarf and the finish.
    (I only have a very hard Aoto from Kameoka, oohira tomae and JNS Shoubudani type 100 to compare).

  3. #1293
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    Nice pickup. That's a decent size and a good width, which to me is the most important of the dimensions. Plus when the price is right, who can complain! Enjoy.

  4. #1294
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    OK I'm lm still learning a lot about Naturals too and have amassed a small collection but this stone looks intimidating. Are you going to prepare it or just go at it? If you could post some pics of the stone and the edge after use. Would be most helpful.

    My take on stones is that there is a looooot of confusion and misconception out there, really hocus pocus. Because each stone is slightly different with infinite variations, its impossible to know how it will perform for you.

    Also, your sharpening technique and steel to be sharpened will change the behavior of different stones. Naguras. OM MY.

    I will say that I do believe that I can produce the sharpest longest lasting edge on them.

    I also think that if you have good sharpening technique, and you get a clean rock from someone that know something about them, you'll be able to get good or great edges. Don't be afraid, just get something and get cracking.

    Quote Originally Posted by riba View Post
    My very modest new stone, a Mizuhikara suita (from MM)

    .

    It is a budget stone (MAX 150mmx87mmx25mm), but I am pretty impressed with how quick it kicks up swarf and the finish.
    (I only have a very hard Aoto from Kameoka, oohira tomae and JNS Shoubudani type 100 to compare).
    One thing you can give and still keep...is your word.

  5. #1295
    Senior Member riba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mucho Bocho View Post
    OK I'm lm still learning a lot about Naturals too and have amassed a small collection but this stone looks intimidating. Are you going to prepare it or just go at it? If you could post some pics of the stone and the edge after use. Would be most helpful.

    My take on stones is that there is a looooot of confusion and misconception out there, really hocus pocus. Because each stone is slightly different with infinite variations, its impossible to know how it will perform for you.

    Also, your sharpening technique and steel to be sharpened will change the behavior of different stones. Naguras. OM MY.

    I will say that I do believe that I can produce the sharpest longest lasting edge on them.

    I also think that if you have good sharpening technique, and you get a clean rock from someone that know something about them, you'll be able to get good or great edges. Don't be afraid, just get something and get cracking.
    I am under the impression that I don't need to do much to the surface (but any suggestions are welcome here -- read: newbie). The stone itself is flat (and the edges were chambered). I am considering putting some nail polish on the sides to protect it. It does have some holes in the surface, but fortunately enough I don't feel them at all while sharpening. (In what way does it look intimidating?).

    I started my JNAT journey with my razorhone (a shoubudani type 100) but didn't manage to get a nice edge. After I bought a pretty hard aoto (8.5 according AframesTokyo) I suddenly managed to get some results with my shoubudani too. Funny how that sometimes works. (the aoto gives a pretty nice gyuto edge btw).
    Some time later I bought a Oohira tomae (2nd hand, originally from JNS), but I guess my technique is still insufficient as the edge gets less sharp when I use it
    With all the recent JNAT activity on the forum, I couldn't restrain myself and bought this Mizuhikara. Must say I am pretty impressed how easy it is to use and how nice (contrasty) the polish is (along with a nice edge).
    I will soon make some pics of the stone in use and of the resulting polish

    I am making this journey at a leisurely pace, as my 3YO daughter takes up most of my free time (and budget hehehe )

  6. #1296
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    I'd lacquer the sides with your choice of protective agent (nail polish is fine) just for peace of mind and to protect your investment, but otherwise, as long as there are no problem spots on the surface that cause you issues while sharpening and you said the edges are fine, so it sounds like its good to go. Little holes aren't uncommon. Sometimes they are natural or result from where the dealer has dug out a small bit of inclusion. I've had several stones that started with a small hole or depression that were subsequently removed with sharpening and lapping, no big deal. Common sense is usually enough to tell you when something might be an issue.

  7. #1297
    Senior Member Mute-on's Avatar
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    My advice from Maxim was to prepare by flattening with an Atoma 140 (or equivalent) to both clean the surface from decades of absorbed grime and contaminants, and ensure it is dead flat. Round over the edges a bit more while you are at it. After that, I use a nagura to recondition the surface (that is now a little cut up from the Atoma), and then use.

    If you use all parts of the stone when sharpening, including rotating the stone 180 degrees from time to time, you can maintain it with a nagura for a long while before it should need flattening again, if ever.

    Cheers

    J

  8. #1298
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    J-Nat Club

    Quote Originally Posted by Mute-on View Post
    My advice from Maxim was to prepare by flattening with an Atoma 140 (or equivalent) to both clean the surface from decades of absorbed grime and contaminants, and ensure it is dead flat. Round over the edges a bit more while you are at it. After that, I use a nagura to recondition the surface (that is now a little cut up from the Atoma), and then use.

    If you use all parts of the stone when sharpening, including rotating the stone 180 degrees from time to time, you can maintain it with a nagura for a long while before it should need flattening again, if ever.

    Cheers

    J
    Clear answer indeed.
    I was too lazy to write it. 100% correctly.
    Just a remark- having used many other i must admit that Atoma 140 is the best solution ever.
    - very effective
    - long lasting
    - affordable in comparison to others( DMT lapping stone, Shapton lapping diamond plate etc)
    Having an impressive collection of Tennen Toishi ( read: lapping/ flattening/ fixing for years) i decided to grab a new one Atoma 140 only a month ago). Still keeping the old one.. greedy greedy?? Not really ( though who knows). You can always use it to work on edges, to use it as a kinda Nagura after aggressive ( new) Atoma etc.

    Cheers

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