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Thread: J.WISS & SONS Shears and Razors

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    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    J.WISS & SONS Shears and Razors

    J.WISS & SONS
    I bring this up because of the association with Boker Knives
    really this post should be called the second dog. as you well see.

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    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

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    1847 - Thirty year-old cutler and gunsmith Jacob Wiss immigrates to the United States from Switzerland. He settles in Newark, New Jersey and is hired by R. Heinisch Sons Company, producers of shears and other cutlery. After getting laid off by Heinisch due to a lack of business, Wiss opens his own small shop in a former stable on Bank Street, forging surgical instruments and shears.

    1848 - Wiss follows Old World manufacturing practice, using a natural stone grinding wheel and a wooden polishing wheel, but shows he is not completely bound by tradition when he introduces power to his one-man operation: The grinding and polishing wheels are turned by a Saint Bernard running on a treadmill. By the end of 1848, business has grown so much Wiss gets a second dog
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

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    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

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    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

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    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    here is something i found from Sheffield you might like.

    The seven-day razor set was very popular from around 1820 to the early 1900s. This boxed set comprises seven open razors with steel blades and ivory scales. Each razor is engraved with a day of the week. The box is made of strips of light and dark wood, which allude to the stripes of the famed Bengal tiger.

    The razors slot into the bottom half of the box and are arranged so that the days of the week, engraved into the ivory, are facing the shaver when he lifts the lid. Each day the shaver would remove a razor, sharpen its edge by 'stropping' it on a piece of leather and then replace it in the box for use a week later. The razor's edge was thought to distort through shaving, and by putting it away to rest for a week, it would recover.

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    Here's hoping you get that second dog
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

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