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Thread: Question about edge sharpness

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by BDD View Post
    I'll Google Shigefusa. I don't need custom knives for home use.
    Good luck as shig's are extremely hard to find in stock--especially in the gyuto style. The best bet if that is what you want is to wait until one comes up on b/s/t here, but not sure that sounds like what you are asking for steel-wise...or as everyone else suggests, just call Jon.

    Cheers

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by ajhuff View Post
    Maybe we're saying the same thing. But to me it's all about application, not material.

    -AJ
    Not really. I think what he's saying is everything -including material- is determined by application.
    For example:
    So as a home cook I want to slice roasts, poultry breasts etc. (application)=> either a sujihiki or yanagiba.

    I'm not slicing sushi and have little interest in learning yanagiba technique and single bevel sharpening (application)=> suji.

    I clean and dry knives after every use (application)=> all types of steels apply

    I want a keen edge and easier sharpening (application) => white steel.

    And so on.

    At least that's the way I understand it.
    "Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough." —Mark Twain

  3. #13

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    Sorry, that's poor communication on my part by "we" I did not mean Jon and myself. By "we" I mean myself and the people who put so much consideration into steel selection. You know who you are.

    -AJ

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    Good luck as shig's are extremely hard to find in stock--especially in the gyuto style. The best bet if that is what you want is to wait until one comes up on b/s/t here, but not sure that sounds like what you are asking for steel-wise...or as everyone else suggests, just call Jon.

    Cheers
    I didn't have any problems finding his knives sold and in-stock. Perhaps you are referring to his "one-off" knives? The ones that can take up to a year to be delivered?

    If any one wants the URL please PM me.

    The Shigefusa gyuto's I saw ranged in price from $350 to just under $800 US.

    I just Googled "Shigefusa knives" for the hell of it since it was mentioned here.

    For me what is important (at this point...never having used a Japanese kitchen knife) is overall balance (weight not more in the handle or blade), moderate weight feel (e.g. don't want a "weightless" feeling knife), blade that can attain/keep (for "long" periods between sharpening) an extremely sharp edge...is near "effortless" to slice/dice through meat/vegetables...ease of sharpening? Least important for me as I might end up having some one else sharpen my knives for me if I decide I don't want to spend the time to learn/practice using whetstones.

    And "application"...home cook..."plate" 2 meals a day for myself. Cutting/slicing vegetables and various meats (e.g. prime rib, chicken, lamb...etc.).

  5. #15
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    My comment about knifes with OTB edges that best show the potential of the steel wasnt ment as a recomendation of "knives you should buy/ are appropriate to your wants", it was just ment part of the academic discussion of sharpenes vs potential sharpness.

    What i was trying to say is that very few, save some really high-end blades, come with edges that even approach the steel's full potential edge performance. Most are just an average starting place from which you can create your desired edge.

    The single biggest factor in edge performace is the sharpening and maintenance skills of the user.

    As long as the knife is made from a "good" steel and properly heat treated the differences between the inherent qualities of the steel will be almost indistinguishable when compared to the geometry and level of polish created by the sharpening job.

    The single biggest performance investment you can make in knives is actually in yourself and your own edge creation and maintenance skills.

  6. #16
    Senior Member VoodooMajik's Avatar
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    It's not the Answer it's the Experience

  7. #17
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    If you have no interest in learning how to sharpen you should get a blazen and send it to Dave Martell or Eamon Burke every 6 months for sharpening

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin0505 View Post
    What i was trying to say is that very few, save some really high-end blades, come with edges that even approach the steel's full potential edge performance. Most are just an average starting place from which you can create your desired edge.

    The single biggest factor in edge performace is the sharpening and maintenance skills of the user.

    As long as the knife is made from a "good" steel and properly heat treated the differences between the inherent qualities of the steel will be almost indistinguishable when compared to the geometry and level of polish created by the sharpening job.

    The single biggest performance investment you can make in knives is actually in yourself and your own edge creation and maintenance skills.
    This was what I was trying to determine. Is it more the sharpening (after we've received the knife) or the type of steel used (e.g. VG10 vs #1 white vs #2 blue..etc.)? Could the type of steel affect the degree of sharpness one can achieve? You say no. Someone else agrees. Not that I disagree. Which makes sense, since, no blade comes sharped to their full potential for one reason or another.

    I used to assume they do (before joining kitchen knife forums and doing a little digging).

    Another question for every one...what makes one knife able to slice through food (e.g. prime rib) more effortlessly than the next knife? Geometry? Type of steel? The degree and competency of the sharpening? All of the above? Or, does it again come down to the sharpening done after we have our knife?

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by obtuse View Post
    If you have no interest in learning how to sharpen you should get a blazen and send it to Dave Martell or Eamon Burke every 6 months for sharpening
    I have local qualified sharpening "experts" to take my knives to should I decide not to bother taking a knife sharpening class using whetstones. I still might. Can't say right now. But thanks for the recommendations. Now to Google "blazen" (another word for "saya"? Sheath?) Or did you recommend a Ryusen Blazen brand knife?

  10. #20
    Blade steel type affecting sharpening potential. While in general it shouldn't matter (as a few of you mentioned and agree)...what I'm now wondering is what if we sent a #1 white steel (Fujiwara MNM Gyuto) and a Takeda blue steel gyuto to the same expert sharpener like Dave Martell...would he not be able to achieve more sharpness with one of the 2 knives?

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