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Thread: Son of a WIP

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    You do not need to get rid of all the pitting, but you need to get rid of all the rust. Sand off, as much as you can and then use a wire wheel or brush to get deep into the pits and get the rust out. Then develop your patina and periodically put some oil on the blade, camelia oil or mineral oil will do.
    As I suggested to Eamon. You might want to consider electrolysis for rust removal if you don't want to induce any more extra scratches and such.

    -AJ

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    It actually is the model 225, but the old ones pre 1940's
    I think I see one on eBay right now for $99? Looks funky enough to want, but not enough to drop a Benny on...!

  3. #13
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    There is a product called Evapo-rust that will neutralize rust without affecting the underlying steel. It avoids the problems associated with electrolysis and acids. It is used frequently in the restoration of antique woodworking tools. It is available at many auto parts places among others. It gets under the rust.
    Spike C
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  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    There is a product called Evapo-rust that will neutralize rust without affecting the underlying steel. It avoids the problems associated with electrolysis and acids. It is used frequently in the restoration of antique woodworking tools. It is available at many auto parts places among others. It gets under the rust.
    Probably just a concoction of phosphoric acid which convert the rust to a rather durable iron phosphate. Available at many farm stores especially in dairy areas, probably Home Depot too. Coca Cola is probably as effective given enough soak time for a knife. What problems have you experienced with electrolysis?

    -AJ

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vertigo View Post
    I think I see one on eBay right now for $99? Looks funky enough to want, but not enough to drop a Benny on...!
    yes, there is one on ebay, but not worth the money once in awhile you can pick them up for 20-40 bucks wouldn't go any higher unless it's perfect and then I may pay a little more. Just for myself wouldn't get that for resale at that price.
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  6. #16
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    don't know how to make the pic bigger. If anyone has a computer brain could they resize it for me?
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  7. #17

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    Okay, so I've worked a lot on this for the past week. Sanding, buffing, polishing, sharpening and soaking the handle. This will still need a new handle. I am impressed with the color and shape difference a couple day's soak in mineral oil made, but it still fits ill and the metal underneath will have to be cleaned up.
    The pitting was serious, some spots along the edge acted as overginds too-so some of the edge is kinda wonky. But it will be corrected over time as more sharpening occurs. Sharpening was tough at first, but once a new edge was formed, the steel really reacted nicely to some higher grit stones. Still some wedging issues with cutting. But hey, It's back in working condition after many years on(what looks like) the Titanic.[IMG][/IMG]
    The pictures don't do the knife justice. The pitting is almost cool looking, like a weird pattern. [IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG]
    This is all for now. Will probably be a little while until I work out a handle. Any ideas/comments on handle material?
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  8. #18

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    Keeping with a restoration theme, some bog oak, or african blackwood would bring the handle back to life, and keep it nearly as dark as it is now.


    Feel free to visit my website, http://www.rodrigueknives.com
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  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by PierreRodrigue View Post
    Keeping with a restoration theme, some bog oak, or african blackwood would bring the handle back to life, and keep it nearly as dark as it is now.
    +1

  10. #20
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Looks great. A huge improvement: it can be used again.
    Any idea of the thickness behind the edge, let's say at 5mm? If you were to perform some thinning a part of the pitting issue would be solved as well. Do you want to keep the finger guard as it is?

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