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  1. #1

    knyfeknerd's Avatar
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    Son of a WIP

    At ECG a couple of weeks ago, Son bequeathed unto me an early 1900's Henckel Chef. Man, this thing is gnarly! The pics don't really do it justice though. And I didn't realize how truly funky it actually was until I started taking some of the black off. I'm slowly working to reveal as much of the steel as I can. Some of the pitting is so bad, it almost feels like it could penetrate over to the other side of the blade. This will require a new handle as well. You also can tell where someone took the egde to a bench grinder or worse. I've got to be careful as this is a seriously thin blade, but I hope to get this in working order again.
    I can see a 102-10 stamped on the blade and the ORKS-of twinworks leftover as well. Son, if you can, please refresh my memory on this knife. You had a lot to say about it in Philly, all of which I've forgotten(thanks to the moonshine).
    All these pics are prior to any sanding, etc.
    [IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG]
    Thanks for the knife Son, I love doing stuff like this.
    If "Its" and "Buts" was candy and nuts, we'd all have a Merry Christmas
    -Cleon "Slammin'" Salmon

  2. #2
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Are you sure it's necessary to remove all pitting? Can't you stop the process by superficial cleaning up and forcing a new patina? That's how I did with Son's Nogent. Am I in error? Will the pitting continue under the new patina? Any comment would be much appreciated.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    Are you sure it's necessary to remove all pitting? Can't you stop the process by superficial cleaning up and forcing a new patina? That's how I did with Son's Nogent. Am I in error? Will the pitting continue under the new patina? Any comment would be much appreciated.
    +1. That's the nicest profile I've ever seen on a Henckels, btw.

  4. #4
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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    Are you sure it's necessary to remove all pitting? Can't you stop the process by superficial cleaning up and forcing a new patina? That's how I did with Son's Nogent. Am I in error? Will the pitting continue under the new patina? Any comment would be much appreciated.
    You do not need to get rid of all the pitting, but you need to get rid of all the rust. Sand off, as much as you can and then use a wire wheel or brush to get deep into the pits and get the rust out. Then develop your patina and periodically put some oil on the blade, camelia oil or mineral oil will do.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    +1. That's the nicest profile I've ever seen on a Henckels, btw.
    The model 102 is my favorite Henkel's profile, it is incredibly thin and nimble. If you can find it there is a model 225 or 202?, I can't remember which, it has the same profile, but doesn't have the heel/choil thing on it. That one is my real favorite.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by knyfeknerd View Post
    At ECG a couple of weeks ago, Son bequeathed unto me an early 1900's Henckel Chef. Man, this thing is gnarly! The pics don't really do it justice though. And I didn't realize how truly funky it actually was until I started taking some of the black off. I'm slowly working to reveal as much of the steel as I can. Some of the pitting is so bad, it almost feels like it could penetrate over to the other side of the blade. This will require a new handle as well. You also can tell where someone took the egde to a bench grinder or worse. I've got to be careful as this is a seriously thin blade, but I hope to get this in working order again.
    I can see a 102-10 stamped on the blade and the ORKS-of twinworks leftover as well. Son, if you can, please refresh my memory on this knife. You had a lot to say about it in Philly, all of which I've forgotten(thanks to the moonshine).
    All these pics are prior to any sanding, etc.
    [IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG]
    Thanks for the knife Son, I love doing stuff like this.
    This is one of the earlier models of the 102. You can tell by the rivet pattern, The first ones that I have seen have three pins, the next batch had 2 pins and a rivet and the final ones have three rivets. This one is made around 1910-to ww1. It is carbon steel, double distal taper, incredible thin at the tip. It can't be any earlier then 1905 because it wouldn't have the 1904 stamp until 1905. They hadn't won the award yet.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    You do not need to get rid of all the pitting, but you need to get rid of all the rust. Sand off, as much as you can and then use a wire wheel or brush to get deep into the pits and get the rust out. Then develop your patina and periodically put some oil on the blade, camelia oil or mineral oil will do.
    A coarse ScotchBrite perhaps? It doesn't leave deep scratches.

  8. #8
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    That is nice, lot of that blade still there looking forward to the WIP .
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    A coarse ScotchBrite perhaps? It doesn't leave deep scratches.
    that should work. If you are going to use a wire wheel and don't want to leave deep scratches use a brass one. It will penetrate the pits and since it is softer than steel no scratches.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    The model 102 is my favorite Henkel's profile, it is incredibly thin and nimble. If you can find it there is a model 225 or 202?, I can't remember which, it has the same profile, but doesn't have the heel/choil thing on it. That one is my real favorite.
    It actually is the model 225, but the old ones pre 1940's
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

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