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Thread: which japanese knife?

  1. #11
    No problem! Then let me ask you a different question:

    What about your Wusthof Icon Classic would you like to improve? Why do you want a different knife?

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by kalaeb View Post
    Welcome to the forum, just out of curiosity...you mentioned you are starting culinary school. Is the knife you are looking into for school? If so, you might want to stay away from the fancy damascus patterns. I have never been to culinary school, but have heard they tend to have some people with sticky fingers. If you are using it for school, I would get something simple and plain, maybe the JCK vg-10 line, a Tojiro, or even a forschner. On the other hand, if you are using it for home, or in a work environement where you can trust your co-workers, then I would splurge some more and get a really good knife.
    thanks for the response.

    The knife will be used on my home, not in culinary school....I know about the "sticky fingers" and I would hate to lose an expensive knife.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    No problem! Then let me ask you a different question:

    What about your Wusthof Icon Classic would you like to improve? Why do you want a different knife?
    I want a different knife just because I like knives a lot.

    I dont have a lot of experience with knives, before the wusthof I had a $20 knife so the change was huge for me, but the problem that I have with the wusthof is that I find very difficult to keep it sharp. Maybe is me, that I dont do a good job shapening the knife

  4. #14
    Engorged Member
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    Having worked on lines for years I have to recommend that you go as "plain Jane" as you can. People grab other peoples knives and stuff can walk away pretty easily. I'd look at the for sale boards here and other sites for a carbon gyuto that's used and seasoned. If its used and little beat up you aren't going to feel bad when you put scratches in it while you're learning to sharpen it or feel bad if someone grabs it and opens a can w/ it. One of the great things about carbon is its pure joy to sharpen.

    Pesky

  5. #15
    Senior Member Citizen Snips's Avatar
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    if you like how the wusthof fits your hand i would probably go with the hiromoto AS. the damascus are pretty but in my opinion the hiromoto is as well. it gives you the experience of a carbon knife while protecting you if this is your first purchase in the japanese knife world. i usually recommend this knife to people who would like to get into japanese knives but are only really used to german cutlery. this was my first knife and i couldn't be happier with what it provided me with. it will also come in under budget.

    http://www.This Site Not Allowed Here.com.com/higykn24.html

  6. #16
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Take a look at this beauty!
    I wish I had a reason to buy it!
    http://www.foodieforums.com/vbulleti...gyuto-like-new
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

  7. #17
    Senior Member
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    I would recommend not buying just yet. I think that you will greatly benefit form spending more time with the tools that you have, and learn how to sharpen them. If you spend more time on the forums you will get a better handle on what makes the different knives better than one or the other. Things that you may think are desirable now may not be so with more knowledge. Some people buy and sell knives until they land on what works best for them, and that is valid, butt you can spend a lot of money that way.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  8. #18
    Engorged Member
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    Good catch Lefty! That's a hell of a knife.

    Pesky

  9. #19

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    All the knives you listed use VG-10 and are not bad knives, but I think you limit the possibilites by looking at only one steel.

    If I had to choose between those knives I would pick the Hattori, although I think Ryusen makes the Hattori and are basically the same steel with the exception of some cosmetic differences.

    The Hiromoto seems pricey for vg-10, maybe it is the Damascus patterning, but I would not pay for it.

    Is there a reason you like vg-10? Again, it is not bad, but in terms of performance, the Hiromoto with the AS carbon core that Citizen Snips recommends is a better knife (steel), as is the monosteel virgin carbon linked in Leftys reply, imo. Both those knives will require more care
    than VG-10, but I like that using carbon forces me to take care of my knives.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    Do you use the traditional European "rock chop" as your technique...if so, are you open to changing to a "push-cut" which is preferable for most Japanese knives due to the profile and hardness?

    Like asked before, do you want to stick with stainless or would you be open to carbon?

    Are you looking for something to use a steel with to touch up quickly, or do you think you will really get into this and purchase some sharpening stones/strops/etc.?

    What kind of cutting board do you have...is it a plastic poly board? Depending on the steel and technique you use, an end-grain wood or sani-tuff rubber board would be a great investment for you at home, as it would protect your edges and make them last much longer.

    Even without these questions answered above, my two current suggestions would be:
    -Fujiwara FKM gyuto 240mm
    or
    -JCK CarboNext gyuto 240mm
    -and then you could purchase a Bester 1200 sharpening stone and keep it all under $200

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