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Thread: which japanese knife?

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cadillac J View Post
    Do you use the traditional European "rock chop" as your technique...if so, are you open to changing to a "push-cut" which is preferable for most Japanese knives due to the profile and hardness?

    Like asked before, do you want to stick with stainless or would you be open to carbon?

    Are you looking for something to use a steel with to touch up quickly, or do you think you will really get into this and purchase some sharpening stones/strops/etc.?

    What kind of cutting board do you have...is it a plastic poly board? Depending on the steel and technique you use, an end-grain wood or sani-tuff rubber board would be a great investment for you at home, as it would protect your edges and make them last much longer.

    Even without these questions answered above, my two current suggestions would be:
    -Fujiwara FKM gyuto 240mm
    or
    -JCK CarboNext gyuto 240mm
    -and then you could purchase a Bester 1200 sharpening stone and keep it all under $200
    hi, thanks for all the answers. I am open to carbon, I pick those knives because I read and thought the were made from good companies and also because I liked how they look, but I have no problem buying another knife.
    I will take a look on the knives you recomended me.

    thanks again

  2. #22
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    I have owned many knives both on the high and lower ends, and recently made a thread about 'knife progression'...and after down-sizing my collection, I still have a Fujiwara FKM and a JCK CarboNext in my arsenal, if that tells you anything. The CarboNext is a higher performer in general, but the Fujiwara is more durable with a great profile.

    Great knives for all levels, but I think they are perfect to get started with--Low cost of entry, will blow away 90% of knives on the market, stain-resistant, not too hard/chippy, and have western handles that will be an easier transition for most at the start.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cadillac J View Post
    I have owned many knives both on the high and lower ends, and recently made a thread about 'knife progression'...and after down-sizing my collection, I still have a Fujiwara FKM and a JCK CarboNext in my arsenal, if that tells you anything. The CarboNext is a higher performer in general, but the Fujiwara is more durable with a great profile.

    Great knives for all levels, but I think they are perfect to get started with--Low cost of entry, will blow away 90% of knives on the market, stain-resistant, not too hard/chippy, and have western handles that will be an easier transition for most at the start.
    I really liked the kanetsugu damascus (http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/Sa...cusSeries.html), but is seems that no one recomended it.

    Well, i have read every post available and I have narrow my search on this knives:

    - Hiromoto AS (http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/Te...akuSeries.html)
    - Fujiwara FKM (http://www.This Site Not Allowed Here.com.com/fufkmgy21.html)
    - Masamoto VG (http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/VG...EIGHT:%20181px)
    - Tojiro DP (http://www.This Site Not Allowed Here.com.com/tojiro-dp-f-8081.html)

    I like the hiromoto the most....but is also one of the most expensive

    As for sharpening, I was thinking about spyderco's sharpmaker



    any thoughts?

  4. #24
    Senior Member FryBoy's Avatar
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    The Edge Pro is head and shoulders above the Sharpmaker. I've used both -- had the Sharpmaker first, wasn't happy with the results, bought the EP, very happy with it, sold the Sharpmaker on Ebay. Also have some experience with free stones -- don't use them enough to feel confident, which isn't a problem with the EP.

    BTW, don't eliminate the Hattori/Ryusen HD knives simply because they're made by Ryusen instead of Hattori -- they are superb knives.
    Doug Collins
    Hermosa Beach, California

  5. #25
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    Well, since you said the main reason you want to go with a Jknife over your current Ikon is sharpness, and ease of keeping it sharp, I am going to +1 on the carbon. Konosuke white #2, like Mario said, is superior in many a way, I feel. It will get wickedly sharp very quickly.

    I feel allot of the knives you like, you may be paying a premium for the look; ie: damascus, over performance.....

    The konosuke will give you high end performance for around $175 (drop the saya).

    http://www.This Site Not Allowed Here.com.com/kowh2wa24.html

  6. #26
    I love the Hiromoto!

    But you need to rehandle it
    Dave does an awesome job

    There are many great knives out there. The Hiro got its fans all over the world. I use my Hiro often and love it. It will never leave my kitchen and Im glad the first japanese knife I ever bought was a Hiro AS. Love it and will never leave it

  7. #27
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    I'd recommend the Hiro AS over a pure carbon as I'm guessing you have not had any experience with carbon knives. Takes a great edge and great edge retaining as well. And it fits nicely into your budget and leaves you with some $$ to get a few stones.
    Otherwise a CN is a great choice too. If you decide on the CN, do not get the ES. Not worth the $10 extra.
    I'd recommend trying free-hand sharpening over using a gig. Unless of course you want a super precise angle, which I don't think is a necessity.

  8. #28
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    A precise angle won't hurt.
    To be honest, it's just worthwhile to learn to freehand. You have more versatility and it's just plain fun!
    For me, the addiction has turned from what do I cut with, to how much can I cut with it before it dulls? Once you get hooked on sharpening, you see a knife and wonder how it feels on the stones.
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    A precise angle won't hurt.
    To be honest, it's just worthwhile to learn to freehand. You have more versatility and it's just plain fun!
    For me, the addiction has turned from what do I cut with, to how much can I cut with it before it dulls? Once you get hooked on sharpening, you see a knife and wonder how it feels on the stones.
    +1 Agree with that tho the reason I free hand in the first place was cause I couldn't afford a gig. Got hooked and have now spent more on stones then I would on an EP LOL

  10. #30
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    You gotta be a minimalist like me and Murray Carter!
    It's so much more rewarding!
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

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