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Deep fry a knife? A Knife making question
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  1. #1
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    Chef Niloc's Avatar
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    Deep fry a knife? A Knife making question

    I was just thinking why not temper a knife in oil, like a frialator? A frier would hold a even temp much better then a oven, would it not work better?

  2. #2
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    I'm sure it would even taste that much better!
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

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    StephanFowler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Niloc View Post
    I was just thinking why not temper a knife in oil, like a frialator? A frier would hold a even temp much better then a oven, would it not work better?
    yep, works great.

    in fact, if you use an appropriate oil and quench directly in to the oil from your HT oven you can get a marquench. which if done right creates Bainite instead of Martensite. (Howard Clark was a pioneer in this concept for swords) most all of Busse's knives are bainite. standard industry practice is to use metallurgical salts for that purpose vs oil because most oil gets unstable at the temperatures we want to use.

    bainite is a VERY tough phase of steel, but loses a couple points of hardness.


    a good friend of mine Walter Sorrells (sword smith, lives about 15 minutes away from me) quenches for 5 seconds into water and then jumps directly into a heated oil bath to finish his quench

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    What temp would be ideal for this Bainite formation?

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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    What temp would be ideal for this Bainite formation?
    The temPerature varies with the steel, austenitizing temperature, and desired hardness. It's typically 400-600F for lower bainite. However, it can't be done by the end user. Once you have martensite you can't just temper some more and get bainite.

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    Can someone explain why the medium used for the tempering matters? could you use an inert gas or ??

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    the thing with most oils is the fact that the flash point of the oil is really close to the temps most would need for tempering (i have thought aobut the frier thing but for safty in ll jsut let the kiln come down to temp and then temper

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    Delbert Ealy's Avatar
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    If you really want to know more about banite then click here: http://www.msm.cam.ac.uk/phase-trans....lectures.html
    and download the lecture on banite. The lecture is very good.
    I will tell you right now that I wish knifemakers would leave the banite alone, for knives the best microstructure you can get is martensite, no ifs ands or buts.

    Back to the topic and Colins original question; fryer oil would work great, however most of us knifemakers don't have commercial fryers available. I work in an enviroment with open flame and sparks all the time and I really wouldn't want one more thing that could suddenly burst into flames in my shop. I worked with commercial fryers alot in the past too, and if I never see another one it will be too soon.

    Laminated metals specialist, Kitchen knife and gadget maker
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    www.mokume-jewelry.net
    "Build a man a fire and he will be warm for a day, set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life"

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    Delbert Ealy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Can someone explain why the medium used for the tempering matters? could you use an inert gas or ??
    Honestly Jim, it really doesn't matter that much, its just that most knifemakers use open air (inside a kiln or oven) because it is easy, and then there are some that want to tinker with the process.

    Laminated metals specialist, Kitchen knife and gadget maker
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    www.mokume-jewelry.net
    "Build a man a fire and he will be warm for a day, set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life"

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    Bill Burke's Avatar
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    I see no reason for it not to work. time at temp is wht's important not what is used to get to the temp. If I am off base here correct me Larrin.

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