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Why are so few cooks learning how to maintain their edges? - Page 2
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Thread: Why are so few cooks learning how to maintain their edges?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by DwarvenChef View Post
    The hard part is getting the info DOWN to the avg users understanding while keeping the info and demo's up enough to keep the mid level people interested. I'm still working on my rough outline, I keep finding more info I want to put out and battle with myself on how/where to fit it in LOL
    Funny you say that. I was just going over what I'd say and was struggling with how much content to deliver. "Along with fire, and edged tool is mankind's most important achievements..." .

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by jayhay View Post
    And, we have a intern at my work now that is a good kid. I suggested some knives, a deco stone, and a ceramic rod. His eyes don't light up, he's kinda the medicated-mellow type, but I like him. Quiet, hard working, will do anything asked. I'm trying to show him there is more to the culinary industry than the grind.
    Better than some of the "give-a-****" people I work with . Keep "cultivating" him, you never know what interests may blossom.

  3. #13
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    There is a well respected chef here that is the head instructor at a local cooking school. I sent one of my knives with him to get some feedback, and he took it to the school and let the other teachers use it as well as the students. He told me that no one used it without supervision, and when I got it back the blade had to be completely reground as it was ruined. This was an O1 blade with the heat treat regimen that I got from Hoss, very hard and tough. When he gave it back to me he had no clue that the blade was ruined. The surface was pitted and it looked like it had been drug across the street behind a car.
    This is the teaching that some guys are getting.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  4. #14
    Senior Member jayhay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by macmiddlebrooks View Post
    Better than some of the "give-a-****" people I work with . Keep "cultivating" him, you never know what interests may blossom.
    Thanks man. Honestly, I wish pro kitchens cultured a more professional attitude and a common respect for all. I try myself, but I'm only one person. I work with a lot of young/cocky/arrogant people who have ultimately very little experience. It's hard.

    I do my job, treat people with a professional attitude and let my work speak for itself. That being said, I never sharpen anybody's knife. I'd happily show them, but I wouldn't do it for them. And everyone has shun's where I work. I genuinely dislike those blades. I figure, if they knew what a sharp knife was, and wanted one, they would have it.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by jayhay View Post
    Honestly, I wish pro kitchens cultured a more professional attitude and a common respect for all.

    .
    Heh...why would a kitchen be different than any place else? These traits are hard to come by these days....no matter where you work. shrug

  6. #16

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    Don't forget that a new 10" Dexter is like $15, so why bother sharpening.

    -AJ

  7. #17
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    I think the problem starts in the culinary schools. The administrators and instructors generally know nothing about knives, steels, stones, sharpening and so on. Moreover, the German knife makers have them hypnotized in the past. That part of my culinary education was pitiful. So, the apathy and/or bad habits take root.

  8. #18
    Senior Member jayhay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikehunter View Post
    Heh...why would a kitchen be different than any place else? These traits are hard to come by these days....no matter where you work. shrug
    True, true. But kitchens are generally worse than other professions, from what I've seen. And almost all my friends/family don't work in a kitchen. They think I'm lying sometimes when I tell them stories. They can't trump me

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by cnochef View Post
    I think the problem starts in the culinary schools. The administrators and instructors generally know nothing about knives, steels, stones, sharpening and so on. Moreover, the German knife makers have them hypnotized in the past. That part of my culinary education was pitiful. So, the apathy and/or bad habits take root.
    Funny you say this...one of my younger co-workers attends a culinary school and says to me "You should totally do a knife sharpening demo at my school 'cause they teach us absolutely nothing 'bout sharpening, even honing..." Really? Your most important tool gets no attention?..Was it always this way? I find it hard to believe.

  10. #20
    Senior Member jayhay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by macmiddlebrooks View Post
    Funny you say this...one of my younger co-workers attends a culinary school and says to me "You should totally do a knife sharpening demo at my school 'cause they teach us absolutely nothing 'bout sharpening, even honing..." Really? Your most important tool gets no attention?..Was it always this way? I find it hard to believe.
    I graduated from one of the better culinary schools in the US about 9 years ago and I can say this is totally true. I remember the CMC's being memorized by one of my knives and how sharp it was. These days, I would not even consider the sharpness I could attain then, sharp now. No one ever talked knives. Just rip 'em on a steel or pass 'em through an electric sharpener and you're good to go.

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