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Why are so few cooks learning how to maintain their edges? - Page 3
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Thread: Why are so few cooks learning how to maintain their edges?

  1. #21
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    Its funny when I started at were I work now, no one even wanted to use a steel on a knife. Now its one of the most used tools in the kitchen. Next is the pull through.

    Baby steps, baby steps.

  2. #22

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    My school has some sort of contract with Mercer. They sell knife kits through the bookstore and some guy comes in once or twice a year to tell us how great their knives are and show people how to sharpen on the Arkansas tri-stone. I feel sorry for the people who spend their money on that junk.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    Its a start. hopefully they go wonder what else is out there.

  4. #24
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    The kitchen is a teaching environment by nature .
    the more experienced should help and encourage the younger people it is part of the CULINARY CODE.
    it only takes one guy in a kitchen with the knowledge to set the pace for the entire kitchen
    everyday you should take upon yourself to learn and pass it on
    I know it's not easy .... but who said the kitchen would be easy .

    Steeley
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  5. #25
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steeley View Post
    The kitchen is a teaching environment by nature .
    the more experienced should help and encourage the younger people it is part of the CULINARY CODE.
    it only takes one guy in a kitchen with the knowledge to set the pace for the entire kitchen
    everyday you should take upon yourself to learn and pass it on
    I know it's not easy .... but who said the kitchen would be easy .

    Steeley
    Very well said.

  6. #26
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    theres quite abit of misinformation out there these days courtesy of shun, henckel, chefs choice, furi etc etc etc. ive noticed recently a strong push in the market towards those lame electric sharpeners and many people that ive worked with past and present depend on them. and lots of cooks have just adapted to working with edges that have a 400 grit finish or so. i watch guys use both hands to force a slice into an onion over and over again...its a touchy issue, i would offer help but i dont really have a nice way of saying "all your knives suck and you really should just learn to sharpen correctly". when theyre ready to learn and ready to listen i show them what i know, until then ignorance is bliss.

  7. #27
    Senior Member JanusInTheGarden's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steeley View Post
    The kitchen is a teaching environment by nature .
    the more experienced should help and encourage the younger people it is part of the CULINARY CODE.
    it only takes one guy in a kitchen with the knowledge to set the pace for the entire kitchen
    everyday you should take upon yourself to learn and pass it on
    I know it's not easy .... but who said the kitchen would be easy .
    Quote Originally Posted by macmiddlebrooks View Post
    I'm thinking you're right....I'd love to to finally find that green kid who's eye's light up and who take's edge maintenance seriously.
    Seriously, where have you guys been! I'm still super green and I've been working 1.5 years in a high end kitchen. You'd be shocked the stations I've been working without proper tutelage. I do the best I can but the education is severely lacking at times. Granted it allows for great motivation to do research on my own. In knife sharpening, for instance, I'm 100% self-taught from this website and a few others on how to do this, and now people are coming to me (paying) for sharpening services. Weird stuff.
    It is our human duty to enjoy life. We’ve got to be greedy about living. We learned that greed is a vice, but that’s old. Greed is a virtue. Especially this greediness for life.

  8. #28
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    Knife care isn't really something that is universally valued when it comes to cooks. And in there defense, why not? I've worked in places where no one even had their own knives and knife skills weren't really demanded of anyone. In most places, it's "cut this junk up and get this stuff done!". Even many michelin starred places don't demand good knife skills. Just because knife skills are important to you doesn't mean it's important to others. And strong knife skills is just one of the many, many aspects of cooking after all.

    For the chefs out there, if you want your cooks to have good knife skills, you should treat knife work as a high level task. Can't cut those onions up to my standards? Well then you can peel potatoes, clean shrimp, clean mushrooms, clean the walk-in, and do all the other tedious, monotonous junk that no one wants to do. Get some knife skills and maybe you can start running a station. I mean, without knife skills, you've got the same skills as a dishwasher, right?

  9. #29
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    well said Phan1. Usually not like that at all in a kitchen.

  10. #30

    JohnnyChance's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by labor of love View Post
    i watch guys use both hands to force a slice into an onion over and over again...its a touchy issue, i would offer help but i dont really have a nice way of saying "all your knives suck and you really should just learn to sharpen correctly". when theyre ready to learn and ready to listen i show them what i know, until then ignorance is bliss.
    Not to mention people seem to think you are being elitist when you say that while carrying a bag with a few grand worth of knives in it.

    I will gladly sharpen any japanese styled knife for anyone any time. That may change if and when there are more than 2 total jknives in our kitchen other than mine. German knives are way less enjoyable to sharpen, so I would just rather not do them. I will gladly sharpen it once and show them what to do, and help them sharpen from that point.

    I just helped a new guy with his the other day. Well, sorta. His kit from school was really, really dull, our Chef called him out it and referred him to me. He later in the night dropped his chefs knife off at my station, which our chef again scolded him for, explaining I was not a sharpening service but I would teach him to sharpen. A week later I brought in my stones and at the end of the night asked if he would like to do a demonstration. He said sure and when I asked him to first show me how he sharpens already he said "I thought this was a demonstration!?" Seriously dude, are you so lazy that you can't sharpen for 10 seconds? Turns out his entire progression takes about a minute, on one stone (whatever one in the tri stone is pointed up at the time) and mostly involves him putting a ton of pressure on the blade and drawing it sideways across the stone and down over the corner. So even though I am a pretty fast sharpener, I am pretty sure the five minutes I took to restore his edge seemed like way too much time to spend sharpening to him. The next day, I see him cutting bread pudding in a hotel pan with the knife I just sharpened and slicing duck prosciutto with a house knife. To be expected really, the money spent on this dude's culinary education was probably some of the most wasted funds of all time. He's not the dumbest cook I have ever met, but he just doesn't have "it". No sense of urgency, no second gear, no common sense, no cook sense, etc. No way he lasts in this business, not even for another year or two.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

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