Quantcast
Anyone use single bevel for normal everyday use?
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28

Thread: Anyone use single bevel for normal everyday use?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    731

    Anyone use single bevel for normal everyday use?

    i guess in place of of a gyuto?

    just curious if anyone has and if it is a good replacement of if it doesn't measure up?

    Pros and cons?

  2. #2
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    542
    I like to use an Usuba for veggies and a yanagi for proteins some days. (I rotate knives a lot)

    Really really like the usuba, it tempted me to pick up a kiritsuke.

    Pros: I don't know really, I just enjoy using them. They're sharp as hell and cut real nice. Cons: They take time to get used too. Harder to sharpen. Different motions and skills required.

  3. #3

    JohnnyChance's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    3,030
    Depends on what you are cooking. You just cant make some cuts on some product with a single bevel that you can with a gyuto, suji or other double bevel. I'm not going to use a yanagi, usuba or kiritsuke to small dice a butternut squash into perfect little cubes, for example.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,627
    I posed this question a while back to a few people. The consensus was no. I understand the "why" now.

    Single bevel knives are use or task specific. While I've seen some single bevels used for tasks which they were not intended, there's really no single bevel knife that's an all purpose knife. You can cut veg with a usuba, but can't butcher or slice protein with it, you can slice with a yanagiba and do some delicate chopping (not necessarily recommended although I've seen Japanese chefs do this on rare occasions), you cannot butcher with it (I've never done this with mine for fear of chipping), you can butcher with a deba but slicing looks difficult as does veg prep.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  5. #5
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    4,227
    You can't comfortably cut thick slices of anything hard because of the crazy steering and wedging. If you only cut thin slices of pretty much anything, you'll be fine.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Lake Tahoe California
    Posts
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    Depends on what you are cooking. You just cant make some cuts on some product with a single bevel that you can with a gyuto, suji or other double bevel. I'm not going to use a yanagi, usuba or kiritsuke to small dice a butternut squash into perfect little cubes, for example.
    This is pretty much it. Always found that using a Yanagi in too many applications caused more wear and tear on the body due to it's geometry. Wedging and steering being the main issues for this user...If you change your style of approach of course it could be satisfactory. As has been said, they are certainly super sharp even when not sharpened often,which helps for certain rough prep.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Salt Lake City
    Posts
    234
    Most days I use my Kiritsuke for the majority of my prep work. From veg to breaking down psmos and portioning out fish fillets. For large and or tough veg it is better to use a gyuto. Due to reasons mentioned before. I also use it as my line knife when the edge on my gyuto becomes unsatisfactory.

    I love that knife and wouldn't want to be without it; however it took 3 months of heavy use to really start to get a consistent every cut how I want it feel, and 3 more after that for things to start becoming second nature with it. 18 months later I'm finally starting to try and branch out more with it (Katsurimuki etc) I do a fair amount of very fine juilienne and dicing. There are tasks it isn't the best for but I can make it work (dice large onion) but for those I use the gyuto

  8. #8
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    wyoming, closer to nowhere than somewhere.
    Posts
    3,501
    Having the Nakiri on the pass a round I am def. thinking of getting a usuba, but def. a Nakiri. Other than the obvious of single and bobble bevel is there any other difference?
    Chewie's the man.

  9. #9
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    3,483
    *double post*

  10. #10
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    3,483
    Quote Originally Posted by Crothcipt View Post
    Having the Nakiri on the pass a round I am def. thinking of getting a usuba, but def. a Nakiri. Other than the obvious of single and bobble bevel is there any other difference?
    an usuba is a totally different beast from a nakiri. i like my usuba, but i only use it for certain things, and it's in no way a multi-tasker like a nakiri. my usuba (a modest yoshihiro white 2) is an incredibly good cutter, as i have it set up to be stupid thin behind the edge, but it wedges badly on anything vaguely hard. just the nature of the beast. it's a chiffonade machine, though, and i love it for shaving garlic.

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts