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Thread: Hot Vinegar Patina

  1. #51
    Hot vinegar works for some knives, and can have really nasty effects on others (e.g., pitting), as I've discovered the hard way (and maybe Panda has too). Room temperature for me from now on.

  2. #52
    Yeah I'd be curious about any downsides to this. At minimum I assume you need to resharpen right away.
    ~Brandon

  3. #53
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    Yeah got pitting and factory edge disappeared.

  4. #54
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    10min per bath sounds like a very long time for a reactive knife. It lools like it there was too much oxidation and the steel started to actually etch/ pit vs jusy patina.

    Remember: any time you're trying a new steel: small steps and frequent assessment.

    Few things: looks like there where a few uneven spots due to contamination or uneven finish. its very important to get an even finish (polish) over the whole blade first and then to to remove all contaminants: first with soap and water, then with alcohol or acetone.
    Inbetween baths, give it a good scrubbing w/ soap and water and extra extra fine steel wool. Then degrease again w/ solvent.

    The finish that you get will likely not be super high contrast but soft and subtle shades of silvery grey. The steel will be less reactive, but will still patina further with use.

    If you clean the blade back up and deslcided to guve tge pcb etch a try, follow Daves directions in the knowledge sub forum (esp re: safety) very closely an remeber that the reaction will happen MUCH faster( in seconds, not minutes.)
    "I gotta tell ya, this is pretty terrific. Ha hahaha, YEAH!" - Moe (w/ 2 knives). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVt4U...layer_embedded

  5. #55
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    justin could you share your process on how you etched your shig? i have a shig kasumi that i would like to etch to tame down that infamous reactivity.

  6. #56
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    I've never really timed the bath time, I just watch the reaction. Using a clear container (like tall jar, jug, or vase) works well. Once i see the reaction start to to slow down a bit (fewer bubbles) I pull it out and give it a quick rinse and dry to stop the reaction and make sure that it doesn't continue in an uneven pattern as the blade dries. Then, I get the vinegar back on the heat to bring it back to a boil. While it's heating, I give the blade a more thorough cleaning / scrubbing and then dry and de-grease. Usually at some point before I'm done cleaning, it's time to take the vinegar off of the heat (you gotta watch is because it will boil over very easily).
    Again, once you figure out a good bath time / when to pull it, the safest way to develop thicker/ more stable patina is by increasing the number of baths, not the length of bath.

    That's my process's pretty much the same as in the video. No real "tricks" just watching the reaction, and building up bath times slowly till you get a feel for it, etc.

    With my Shig's and more reactive knives, I've used the hot vinegar bath as a way to set a base layer and make establishing additional patina a more forgiving process, but then I've continued to develop additional patina either through natural use or additional forced methods.
    Once such method for additional patina / more interesting color and pattern is to heat up the blade up by pouring on hot water and to then apply a thin layer of raw animal juice (beef blood works well), let it dry a bit, then rinse again under hot water. You will usually start to see the colors as the blade dries after the rise. Through experimentation, you will get a sense of where the line is between developing pretty colors / building up a protective layer and going too far and entering the realm of red/brown rust and pitting (just like with the vinegar bath).

    If you want quicker and more dramatic results, then try the PCB etchant/ vinegar solution method outline in great detail by Dave: http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...-amp-Re-Etchng - that process remind me much more of developing a photographic print in a dark-room: you actually see the charge / reaction happening right in front of your eyes, so learning when to stop is a bit easier. In general, it's a less fiddly process. I've got pics of my latest results on the last page.
    "I gotta tell ya, this is pretty terrific. Ha hahaha, YEAH!" - Moe (w/ 2 knives). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVt4U...layer_embedded

  7. #57
    Senior Member cclin's Avatar
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    I received my Tanaka blue#2 135mm petty today. I rounded the Spine+choil & decide to use it as guinea pig for etching. I use 40% PCB etchant/60% vinegar solution then following Dave's instruction, wipe clean/dry, lightly polish with Flitz, finish up with 0000 steel wool and Camellia Oil . the result is quite nice....silver with dark gray color!


    you can see core steel(Hagane) & soft steel cladding(Jigane) clearly from top of spine
    Charles ***[All statements I made here only my personal opinion and nothing more!]*** & Please bare with me for my crappy English!!

  8. #58
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    That looks awesome!

  9. #59
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    quick question, why ferric chloride AND vinegar? arent you supposed to dilute the acid with water?

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