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Thread: History of Western Knives Crafted in Seki, Japan

  1. #11
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    A good read, as usual. Thanks.

  2. #12
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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    Awesome, cool Info.

    I was under the impression that if you get sparks when you are hammering it is a bad sign.
    They are hammering the Tamahagane bloom into steel, there is going to be sparks until everything gets compressed into a workable billet.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    They are hammering the Tamahagane bloom into steel, there is going to be sparks until everything gets compressed into a workable billet.
    That's what I was assuming. The impurities need to be hammered out(sparks), carbon incorporated, steel is produced?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlassEye View Post
    That's what I was assuming. The impurities need to be hammered out(sparks), carbon incorporated, steel is produced?
    Also general compression I would think. Sparks are loose material, as it gets tighter and denser you lose less with each strike, just guessing based on scraps of stuff in my head... I'm probably way off base here.

  5. #15
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    They are hammering the Tamahagane bloom into steel, there is going to be sparks until everything gets compressed into a workable billet.
    Nevermind- son beat me to it...

  6. #16
    Nice read. And I only just realised that Mari was female.

  7. #17
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    Mari has totally changed my impression of Korin for the better. I may not buy a lot of stuff, but they will get my business!
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  8. #18
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Korin_Mari View Post
    You know, I was under that impression too. Mr. Sugai told me its a sign of bad material if sparks fly while its on the sharpening wheel... Maybe it doesn't apply for swords? I have to go ask.

    Eamon mentioned about sparks when hammering and you spoke of it on the wheel. I suppose there can be no sparks if it is a water wheel.

    I supose there should be some significance of color of the sparks? temperature ( heat generated) and materials flying off?

    How about organising a paid tour to these knifemakers under your expert tour?? There could be some interest; afterall it is THE Kitchen Knife Forums.

    Have fun..

    D

  9. #19
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Great thread!

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by zitangy View Post
    Eamon mentioned about sparks when hammering and you spoke of it on the wheel. I suppose there can be no sparks if it is a water wheel.

    I supose there should be some significance of color of the sparks? temperature ( heat generated) and materials flying off?

    How about organising a paid tour to these knifemakers under your expert tour?? There could be some interest; afterall it is THE Kitchen Knife Forums.

    Have fun..

    D
    +1: The language barrier would kill it for any non native speaker otherwise. Also as part of the tour, can you include japanese deep fried chicken. I know they are not known for it, but the one time I had it in Tokyo - a whole fried chicken. It was amazing. Blew everything else i had tried to date out of the water.

    Oh there will probably be some of that sushi thing too...

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