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Thread: The First CookBook 's

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    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    The First CookBook 's

    The first records of recipes being put down in print or scroll's or tablets .
    here are some through the ages .

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    The meats included beef, lamb, goat, pork, deer and fowl - the birds provided both meat and eggs. Fish were eaten along with turtles and shellfish. Various grains, vegetables and fruits such as dates, apples, figs, pomegranates and grapes were integral to the ancient Near Eastern diet. Roots, bulbs, truffles and mushrooms were harvested for the table. Salt added flavor to the food as did a variety of herbs. Honey as well as dates, grape-juice and raisins were used as sweeteners. Milk, clarified butter and fats both animal fats and vegetable oils, such as sesame, linseed and olive oils were used in cooking.

    Many kinds of bread are mentioned in the texts from the lowliest barley bread used for workers' rations to elaborate sweetened and spiced cakes baked in fancy, decorated moulds in palace kitchens.

    Beer (usually made of fermented barley mush) was the national beverage already in the third millennium BC, while wine grown in northern Mesopotamia was expensive and only enjoyed by the royal household or the very rich.

    This tablet includes 25 recipes for stews, 21 are meat stews and 4 are vegetable stews. The recipes list the ingredients and the order in which they should be added, but does not give measures or cooking time - they were clearly meant only for experienced chefs.

    YBC 4644 from the Old Babylonian Period, ca. 1750 BC

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    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  2. #2
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    which brings us to the oldest cookbook.
    FORME OF CURY

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    and a recipe for hare.
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    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

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    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    cooking for the royals bourgeois.
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    salmon in champagne
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    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

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    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    well my image host has been acting up sorry have to add to this when the bug is worked out.
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

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    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Great, I look forward to this. But don't forget about Apicius

    Stefan

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    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Great theme. Looking forward to more. Great stuff.

  7. #7
    Great stuff

    I once got a chance to buy "just" one hundred years old english cookbook.

    What struck me was that back then the fillet steak was the cheapest cut of meat, just cause It wasnt fatty or available on the bone.

    This just made me thinking, bollocks nouvelle cuisine, bollocks Blumenthal. Its just a trend.

  8. #8
    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    Think my oldest cookbook is from the early 1900's I have a ton of early 30's and 40's product flier recipes, lol some scary stuff with Frito Leys

  9. #9
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    Ok well give it a go.

    this post is brought to in honor of DR. Stefan

    APICIUS de re culinaria is a set of books using the name of the roman glutton and gourmet Marcus Gavius Apicius in the 9th century.
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    The oldest collection of recipes to survive from antiquity, De Re Coquinaria ("The Art of Cooking") is attributed to Marcus Gavius Apicius, the famed epicure who flourished during the reign of Tiberius early in the first century AD"in imitation of Apicius" ate camel heels, cockscombs, the tongues of peacocks and nightingales, the brains of flamingos and thrushes, partridge eggs, the heads of parrots and pheasants, and the beards of mullets.

    this copy is from 1483
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    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  10. #10
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    The oldest cookbook very well may be by Apicius, but that is not to say that he was the first epicure. That was Archestratus, a Sicilian Greek whose fourth-century BC poem on gastronomy survives only in the sixty or so fragments preserved in the Deipnosophists of Athenaeus. In reading them, one is struck by his emphasis on simplicity and insistence that a delicate fish be sprinkled only with a little salt and basted with olive oil, "for it contains the height of pleasure within itself"

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    some recipes
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    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

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