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Thread: concave/convex grind questions

  1. #1

    concave/convex grind questions

    It's easy enough to imagine ways in which convex grinds are achieved on new blades, but concave? ... I imagine it basically has to be done by holding the blade against the convex surface of a grinding wheel. Does anyone know? ... In which case, how are are concave blades polished? You wouldn't be able to use flat stones to contact the hollowed out parts, or do the makers actually use high-grit wheels?

    Also, how prevalent are concave and convex grinds? I imagine it depends on which knife - so let's say with Japanese-made gyutos, for example. Which is more prevalent?

    (Apologies if this has been discussed before, but I did try to search around...)
    Last edited by Cutty Sharp; 07-08-2012 at 05:36 PM. Reason: stupid typing mistake!

  2. #2
    Convex geometry is easier to finish on a machine, so it is more prevalent. Concave geometry has to be finished by hand, so very few grind this way.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    Convex geometry is easier to finish on a machine, so it is more prevalent. Concave geometry has to be finished by hand, so very few grind this way.
    Makes sense, thanks. Do you know more about the process? How do they grind into and polish the hollows?

  4. #4
    Some forge hollow using convex dies, some use scrapers called sen. It can't be done on a wheel, as it would have to be humongous.

    Hollow is polished by hand, using abrasives with material that can conform to the concave like rubber, finger stones, or a block with same radius as the concave.

    One way or another, a process is very inefficient and expect a knife with a nice polish to cost a good coin.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  5. #5
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    Are you thinking of the concavity on the backside of single bevel knives, or double bevel knives that are hollow ground?
    The back of single bevel knives is ground in with large wheels and I've seen videos where the hollow is then polished on a wooden wheel.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    Some forge hollow using convex dies, some use scrapers called sen. It can't be done on a wheel, as it would have to be humongous.

    Hollow is polished by hand, using abrasives with material that can conform to the concave like rubber, finger stones, or a block with same radius as the concave.

    One way or another, a process is very inefficient and expect a knife with a nice polish to cost a good coin.

    M
    hollow grinding is done all the time by wheel... its common practice in japan.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    hollow grinding is done all the time by wheel... its common practice in japan.
    Depends what radius wheels we are talking about. For single-beveled knives 24-48" radius wheels would work fine, but won't for double beveled. For latter you would need 72-84" radius concave, so no wheels of that size exist, as far as I know. Shigefusa double beveled knife hollow is in that range.

    M

    PS: Eamon you are correct, but to a degree. Grinding on 10" wheel on a diagonal will give you abut 13-14" diameter, effective increase in radius by 3-4", but far from doubling it.


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  8. #8
    The effective radius is increased by holding the blade at a slant, perpendicular to the grinding wheel. They are already pretty big though.

  9. #9
    Just want to add that we might be talking about different things. From the original post, the question was about grinds on double-beveled knives, so my responses were geared toward those.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cutty Sharp View Post
    ...Also, how prevalent are concave and convex grinds? I imagine it depends on which knife - so let's say with Japanese-made gyutos, for example. Which is more prevalent? ...


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  10. #10

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