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Thread: Tomahawk Steak Recipe Needed

  1. #1
    Senior Member Tristan's Avatar
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    Tomahawk Steak Recipe Needed

    Hi, my local butcher just randomly started bringing in Australian Wagyu (margaret river cows + marketing) Tomahawk steaks.

    They look massive, and likely good eating.

    Anyone here has an amazing recipe for it along with cooking tips and a sauce to go with?

    I have one steak dinner a week, but never handled a tomahawk. I don't want to ruin a lot of very expensive meat.

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    A sauce? I believe the only thing that goes on a steak is salt.

    -AJ

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    Senior Member Duckfat's Avatar
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    The thing about a Tomahawk is that it's just a long bone rib eye. For what two of those Wagyu Tomahawks cost you can likely buy an entire prime bone in rib eye. If you buy a whole loin Let it age in the cryo in your fridge for four weeks. Take it out of the cryo and put it on a wire rack to dry for another 3-5 days in the fridge. You will have outstanding steaks only instead of one meal you will have several. Prime rib is easy to cut into steaks. Just remove the chine bones and cut up your steaks the size you want them. If you really want that Tomahawk look you can trim the end of the loin and French the bones. They wont be long bones like a Tomahawk should be but they will still taste great. Sort of a mock Tomahawk or maybe a cleaver steak. Be sure to grind those trimmings for burger if you go that route.
    As far as cooking the Tomahawk cook it the same way you would any other steak just wrap the bone with foil. For me that means getting the BGE up to around 550+ on dome temp. Season the steaks and let them set out at room temp about an hour in advance. I toss a Mesquite chunk in the BGE after it's up to temp. Sear both sides of the steak and shut done the lower vent and daisy wheel on the BGE and let the steak set in the smoke 3-4 minutes. Pull and rest. I like MR so if you like your steak more or less done simply adjust you cook time. You can use the same technique on most charcoal grills with a lid like a webber. Even a Sportsmans Hibachi can be used like that if you have an old webber lid.
    Sauce? Oh yeah. Ice cold Longboard, Bells Oberon or maybe some Dogfish Head IPA.

    Dave

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    Senior Member Namaxy's Avatar
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    For a steak like that, I suggest nothing but salt and pepper, and grilling on an open charcoal/wood flame.

    Then, focus on the sides rather than adorning the steak itself, in this case grilles asparagus, corn pudding and pommes anna.

    Dave in the post above has described perfectly how to cook them on the BGE if you go that route

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    If your beef has a lot of marbling (like some export quality aussie wagyu), grilling on a direct heat will take that fat away heaps. Kinda waste of money for the marbling, IMO.

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    Senior Member Namaxy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by schanop View Post
    If your beef has a lot of marbling (like some export quality aussie wagyu), grilling on a direct heat will take that fat away heaps. Kinda waste of money for the marbling, IMO.
    Agreed. One of the advantages of the BGE is you sear it first, then crank down the temp to well under 300 F to finish.

    I like the reverse cook for a lot of meat cuts, but I still feel a 'steak' benefits from some flame and smoke.

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    Senior Member Duckfat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by schanop View Post
    If your beef has a lot of marbling (like some export quality aussie wagyu), grilling on a direct heat will take that fat away heaps. Kinda waste of money for the marbling, IMO.
    That's true with a high number Wagyu but not so much for most with out a number grade or US wagyu (Meat on marketing steroids). I'm glad to let some of that fat go myself. A steak like this sears very fast so loss is minimal.

    Dave

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    Senior Member Tristan's Avatar
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    From this store, i typically treat myself to a 6/7 marbling aussie wagyu. Whether the numbering convention is standardised out here is anyone's guess. Bigger numbers visually have a better marbling, and I've not gone past 8/9. I can't remember the marbling on the tomahawks.

    Yeah, every single week my steaks are done with salt and pepper. The only weird thing I do is I have this white truffle salt (made with white truffles and sea salt flakes, not truffle essence at least the bottle says so) which I use in place of regular kosher/table/sea salt. I will get around to trying hawiian pink, black, pacific ocean and fleur de sel (just bought a bucket) eventually, but been really happy with truffle salt for some reason.

    I was asking about the sauce because, well, it would be food for the folks. And I think they are used to putting some sauce on the meat. Was thinking along the lines of a good grilled pear burnt cognac and cream sauce on the side... but I haven't nailed the proportions. Was hoping someone out there did.

    Thanks for the BGE guide, I'm sure it will help many who are on the fence about one. I'll think about shipping. Heck, if it works out, I'll think about distributing... I'm sick of how all the good stuff is in your neck of the woods Now there's an idea for a monday...

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    In my not very humble opinion, a rib eye should never ever be sauced. I personally think filet is way over rated and is adored by people who confuse texture with flavor. It's a tender cut with no flavor, ergo why you see so many filet with bacon combinations. Strips, ok to sauce. Sirloin yes. Porterhouse, no. The lesser the cut of meat, and I rank rib eye at the top, the more appropriate a sauce is. My opinion. I won't touch a rib eye with sauce on it. Not really crazy about anything other than salt on it.

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    The ribeye is my favorite cut and I have it as often as I can. (or sneak into the house) I have been fooling around with a reverse sear that is getting me some really great results.

    I will rest the steak at least overnight uncovered in the fridge, with a generous salt and pepper application. When I am ready to prepare it I put it in a cold oven set for 170 degree for between 20-30 minutes- based on the thickness and who I am cooking it for, 20 minutes for a 1 inch thick, well marbled steak will give me a true Medium with just the texture change from rare that I like.

    I then light my fire and get the lump and wood chunks Hickory/plum burning very hot. I run the steaks out and get them on the coals, shifting them once and flipping once.

    This gets me a true "Pink on the inside and Crusty on the outside" with perfect x cross hatches.

    There is a lot going on with this, from giving the salt time to work, to getting the surface of the meat dry for a good sear. I have really been enjoying these steaks cooked this way, and find the concept works really well with other products like sausage and even burgers.

    The feedback on this has been really inspiring so I am still experimenting with it.

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