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Thread: Tomahawk Steak Recipe Needed

  1. #11
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    I use tellicherry extra bold peppercorns and blue diamond kosher salt.
    Here is an interesting article on seasoning before or right when you cook.

    http://www.foodandwine.com/articles/...seasoning-meat

  2. #12
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    The methid Jim explained is very good. I will probably do a ribeye today or tomorrow, reverse sear in a pan, good salt, maybe pepper. No sauce.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    The ribeye is my favorite cut and I have it as often as I can. (or sneak into the house) I have been fooling around with a reverse sear that is getting me some really great results.

    I will rest the steak at least overnight uncovered in the fridge, with a generous salt and pepper application. When I am ready to prepare it I put it in a cold oven set for 170 degree for between 20-30 minutes- based on the thickness and who I am cooking it for, 20 minutes for a 1 inch thick, well marbled steak will give me a true Medium with just the texture change from rare that I like.

    I then light my fire and get the lump and wood chunks Hickory/plum burning very hot. I run the steaks out and get them on the coals, shifting them once and flipping once.

    This gets me a true "Pink on the inside and Crusty on the outside" with perfect x cross hatches.

    There is a lot going on with this, from giving the salt time to work, to getting the surface of the meat dry for a good sear. I have really been enjoying these steaks cooked this way, and find the concept works really well with other products like sausage and even burgers.
    I've also had a LOT of success cooking steaks using the "reverse" sear method. For steaks thicker than 1 inch, this is now my preferred method of cooking.

    As Jim pointed out, salting well in advance of cooking is essential in my opinion. At least four hours before I want to cook a steak, I'll lightly salt all sides of the steak and let it sit in the fridge, uncovered or loosely covered with plastic wrap, flipping the steak over midway through the time so that one side doesn't sit in any excess liquid. However, you want to make sure you give the steak enough time to reabsorb the liquid that is initially drawn out by the salting. Overnight is usually safest to ensure that the liquid has been reabsorbed.

    If I'm cooking outdoors, I'll put the steak on the grill (cold) as far away from the heat (I use charcoal dividers to push all the charcoal to one side), get the grill to go as low as possible, anywhere from 175 to 200 and let it slow roast. (For indoor cooking, depending on what else I'm cooking and when I want the steaks done, I'll cook it in the oven as Jim described on a rack over a sheet pan anywhere from 150 to 200 degrees.)

    When it gets to 95 degrees inside, I remove the steak and let it rest, lift the grill, push the charcoal dividers together in the center, and open up all the vents and remove the lid to get the charcoal roaring hot. I re-season the steak with salt and pepper, and then sear it over direct heat on both sides until I get my desired temp of 130. The actual direct heat cooking time is usually less than 3 minutes a side.

    I've noticed that the temperature rise after taking the meat off the grill is less than what is experienced when cooking the entire time over high heat. I assume that this is because less time is spent grilling over high heat. In my experience, I've noticed that the resting temperature rises about 5 degrees, rather than 10 degrees.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  4. #14
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    For a really, really good beef, you can always try Italian stallion way. Serve it just like the fame Bistecca alla Fiorentina: really high heat sear with lumps, two sides, and aim for blue in the middle. Cut it up, pour in good quality olive oil, and may be extra salt and pepper. A good quality aged balsamic can also be paired with the steak.

  5. #15
    For a roast of any sort, I love the 'reverse sear' or whatever various names the method takes on. For me that means sous vide to 130F, then hold, then sear on very high heat with fat and aromatics. A rib roast cooked with this method is fantastic. Ditto loin. But if you parse the meat into steaks, for me, (IE personal preference), I need more char and smoke. I can't get enough flavor with only 3 - 4 minutes over wood.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    Lol when I first saw this thread I was wondering what the @#$$ a tomahawk steak was. We call them here a "cowboy cut." Have never heard it called anything else. As for sauce, maybe a oz. off to the side for something a little different, maybe some horseradish, or even some real wasabi. But never on the steak its self.
    Chewie's the man.

  7. #17
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    The only sauce I've used on ribeyes and strips of decent quality (nothing to compare to what you're cooking) has been fifteen year old balsamic vinegar reduced almost to a syrup and mounted with some excellent butter. The quality of the butter and the balsamic are crucial--use good stuff, or not at all.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    omg that sounds go good. Still would only have it on the side.
    Chewie's the man.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Duckfat's Avatar
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    Every time I've seen a Cowboy cut it was fabricated from a standard bone in prime rib. For those of you who may have never seen a long bone rib it is in essence the whole rib primal with the short rib meat removed but the rib bones left intact and not cut short like a bone in rib eye sub-primal that is commonly sold in cryo. It's not a common cut and the bone is much longer than a cowboy steak. This is just for aesthetics but costs more as you are loosing the bone in short ribs.

    Dave

  10. #20
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    The ribeye is my favorite cut and I have it as often as I can. (or sneak into the house) I have been fooling around with a reverse sear that is getting me some really great results.

    I will rest the steak at least overnight uncovered in the fridge, with a generous salt and pepper application. When I am ready to prepare it I put it in a cold oven set for 170 degree for between 20-30 minutes- based on the thickness and who I am cooking it for, 20 minutes for a 1 inch thick, well marbled steak will give me a true Medium with just the texture change from rare that I like.

    I then light my fire and get the lump and wood chunks Hickory/plum burning very hot. I run the steaks out and get them on the coals, shifting them once and flipping once.

    This gets me a true "Pink on the inside and Crusty on the outside" with perfect x cross hatches.

    There is a lot going on with this, from giving the salt time to work, to getting the surface of the meat dry for a good sear. I have really been enjoying these steaks cooked this way, and find the concept works really well with other products like sausage and even burgers.

    The feedback on this has been really inspiring so I am still experimenting with it.
    You're definitely on to something Jim. I've done a variation on this- doing hanger steak sous vide to 125, then searing on a plancha with smoked butter. Nice tight but supple texture, and an amazing crust. I'll probably p**s a couple aficionados off here, but I far prefer a seared crust to a grilled crust. I love the flavor that the grill imparts, but I don't find the crust to be as satisfying as it is on a flat surface. I like to do my steaks and burgers on a plancha and flip them constantly. Beautiful crust, juicy flesh, and even doneness. I'll toss the burgers in an oven to let em finish after I get a nice sear. It's a little difficult in a restaurant setting, as I normally utilize it, but it's worth the time IMO no matter where you're heatin your meat. Pre salting is essential. It helps activate the myosin proteins in the meat, which aid in texture, moisture retention, color, and tenderness. Well worth the planning.

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