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Usaba v Nakiri
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Thread: Usaba v Nakiri

  1. #1

    Usaba v Nakiri

    Hi

    I might have asked this before so forgive me

    What are the main differences bewteen a Usaba and Nakiri please

    Alan

  2. #2
    usuba is a single bevel knife geared towards professional cooks wheras nakiri is a double bevel thin knife geared towards cutting veggies in home kitchens.

  3. #3
    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    As Jon pointed out, the usuba is a heavy bodied blade for robust use and the nakiri is waffer thin and not much for the line as mush as it is better suited for home use. I have both and if I'm cutting a large amount of veg I'll break out the usuba but not for small jobs.

    I love both my nakiri (CarterKU180) and my usuba (konusukiKU165) but for very different uses as stated above. Idealy I would like my two knives size swapped out having a shorter nakiri and a longer usuba but I really can't argue they are both great knives.

  4. #4
    Senior Member VoodooMajik's Avatar
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    Usaba is more specialized, though I haven't used one.

    I use my Nakiri on the line, and for many things in place of gyuto's some days, depending on my mood. I only have a cheapy but am still happy with the purchase

    Not sure about a nakiri being "Waffle" thin unless compared to thick spined single bevels. Might need to check out an Usaba though
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    Quote Originally Posted by DwarvenChef View Post
    As Jon pointed out, the usuba is a heavy bodied blade for robust use and the nakiri is waffer thin and not much for the line as mush as it is better suited for home use. I have both and if I'm cutting a large amount of veg I'll break out the usuba but not for.
    I always thought usuba were more delicate and therefore only professionals used them.

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  7. #7
    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    usuba is thicker at the spine, but the edge is very thin and delicate.
    Most single bevel edges are thin, very true, but i have yet to get a knife with a thinner edge than my Carter Nakiri LOL. Although the Kochi gyuto comes close to it at the edge, the Carter nakiri is just crazy thin from spine to edge.

  8. #8
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DwarvenChef View Post
    Most single bevel edges are thin, very true, but i have yet to get a knife with a thinner edge than my Carter Nakiri LOL. Although the Kochi gyuto comes close to it at the edge, the Carter nakiri is just crazy thin from spine to edge.
    my usuba's edge is substantially thinner than my Kochi was OOTB. other usubas i've handled have been the same.

  9. #9
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    I've been curious about this too. Are usuba only used to make paper thing slices or are they relegated to heavier tasks as well?

  10. #10
    I have a few Nakiri's, but no Usuba. I like my Nakiri's for home cooking, which is all I do. They fly thru the veggies easily with little sticking or wedging. Most of my gyuto's stick or wedge too much for me in potatoes and onions and stuff like that, so the Nakiri works better. I am having a custom Nakiri blade made up for me by Randy Haas with a longer blade, between 7 and 8" long blade Having the Nakiri for veggies lets me leave the gyuto for the proteins and stuff; gyuto has a slightly more toothy edge and the Nakiri is the one I polish up more.

    With the Usuba, I was under the impression that it was more specialized for more delicate work, not necessarily for the "pro kitchen high volume" environment. Sushi environment, yes. I don't think a Usuba would do well cutting onions and stuff with the thicker spine and single bevel, but I may be wrong since I haven't gotten to handle/use one yet.

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