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Thread: Usaba v Nakiri

  1. #11
    usuba is used for katsuramuki, ken cuts, tournes, garnish work, slicing veggies, cutting negi, sasagaki, and similar tasks in professional environments (high volume and not)

  2. #12
    See, I was wrong!! For some reason, I though it was more of a delicate knife and not the best for high volume stuff, board cutting, that type of thing.

  3. #13
    so many people in the US think its a delicate knife only used on rare occasions because so few people here know how to use them well, end up buying them, and watch them chip like crazy or change shape as they sharpen. It takes a little learning and practice, but they are absolutely built for real use... they often see board contact, high volume, etc.

  4. #14

    knyfeknerd's Avatar
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    The nakiri(depending on the maker/steel/ht/etc) is a tougher knife. I am not a sushi chef. I use my usuba for super-fine and delicate tasks- julienne, micro-dice of veg, and still trying to master katsuramuki. Not great for onions because of the thickness of the spine, and it's not a BANG BANG BANG on the cutting board kinda knife. Some serious steering on an usuba as well. The usuba's edge is more delicate, but probably the sharpest in my kit to boot. I wouldn't get (an expensive) one unless you really have the need for it.
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  5. #15
    Senior Member Seth's Avatar
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    It also depends on the particular maker or model, for Usubas. I have a suisin ginsanko which is pretty robust and thick on the spine. I also have a nenohi which is larger but thinner and is of a delicate and super sharp type. It will chip and keeping a straight edge when sharpening is a challenge (and good for technique practice). The nenohi is excellent with onions and will do both horizontal and vertical cuts with no wedging or resistance. The point being that you would have to pay close attention to each individual usuba as the two I have are very different in abilities. Some of our friends down under have shig usubas which are very very thin.
    Everywhere you go, there you are.

  6. #16
    Yeah, when I was first looking at the Nakiri vs Usuba debate online, I learned that the usuba is more delicate/specialized and not as good of a general veggie knife and the Nakiri was much better for veggies and stuff and would be easier to use and take care of. Maybe now I need a Usuba?

  7. #17
    Senior Member VoodooMajik's Avatar
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    +1, I'm thinking the same in the near future Taz.
    It's not the Answer it's the Experience

  8. #18
    Senior Member Seth's Avatar
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    You also have to keep in mind, maybe obvious, that nikiris usually have a little bit of a belly and usubas are flat on the edge - big difference in use. (Although, I have taken one of my usubas and put a tiny belly - like 1mm across 220mm. The verdict is out on that one.)
    Everywhere you go, there you are.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    It sounds like I better buy that usaba first.
    Chewie's the man.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Seth View Post
    You also have to keep in mind, maybe obvious, that nikiris usually have a little bit of a belly and usubas are flat on the edge - big difference in use. (Although, I have taken one of my usubas and put a tiny belly - like 1mm across 220mm. The verdict is out on that one.)
    a very slight curve up at the tip of a kamagata usuba (about a mm or so) is pretty common and helps out with some common techniques

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