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Would your chefs knife pass the ABS Master Smith Test? - Page 2
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Thread: Would your chefs knife pass the ABS Master Smith Test?

  1. #11

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    Well, lots of things can shave; guys have videos of themselves shaving with spoons. The ABS shaving tests I believe uses arm hair, which is a bit different than facial hair. The Deba I doubt would pass the chopping tests; the edge the Deba's I have seen is pretty thin and I think it would roll over or chip, especially if you hit a knot.

  2. #12

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    Aside from ABS tests, your Tanaka KU has a wire edge, or else your cutting board is made of granite.

  3. #13

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    Or glass Seriously, it took a little longer to sharpen up the Tanaka compared to the White #2 knives I have used and it took a bit longer to remove the burr, but once I had the edge on there, it's been fine and I use a bamboo board. Takes a screaming sharp edge, too

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    Aside from ABS tests, your Tanaka KU has a wire edge, or else your cutting board is made of granite.
    Could be wireedge and or using Tanaka KU original factory wavy+over-grinded edge. This week, I had to hammered (bottom half of blade) & reprofiled (1knife lost 3mm height) my sibbling's 2 brandnew Tanaka KU before their edges are true (straight & no holes). DIY knives however reward with scary sharp (4 tickling-stuck fingers test), still super sharp after 3 homecook meal preps.

  5. #15

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    I have performed the test on my own several times and passed, I have also witnessed others, including a master smith do the test. My thoughts are as follows

    The rope slice- displays that the knife has the geometry to cut and is not a sharpened pry bar- chef's knives should not have a problem with this.
    2x4 chop- shows that the edge is heat treated and will not roll, also that the edge is not too thin or too hard- I believe with proper edge thinness for a chef knife, the blade should not roll but should chip, as we want thin hard edges.
    Shaving after the chop- displays edge retention- most chef knives should pass this test however may be difficult if they are really chipped
    90 degree bend test- shows the ability of the smith to execute differential heat treating or differential tempering (they are different). Many chef's knives will pass this part of the test because of the thin cross section however some may need to be differentially tempered to pass. Most of the abs style knives are 1/4 inch or so thick, so they usually need a differential heat treat.

    This is just my opinion and observations...

  6. #16
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    I wonder if your talking about the Tanaka edge out of the box. Almost all Japanese knives need to be sharpened out of box. I own 2 of his knives and both needed sharpened ootb.
    Chewie's the man.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by JMJones View Post
    I have performed the test on my own several times and passed, I have also witnessed others, including a master smith do the test. My thoughts are as follows

    90 degree bend test- shows the ability of the smith to execute differential heat treating or differential tempering (they are different). Many chef's knives will pass this part of the test because of the thin cross section however some may need to be differentially tempered to pass. Most of the abs style knives are 1/4 inch or so thick, so they usually need a differential heat treat.

    This is just my opinion and observations...
    And I think the quality of the forging, demonstrating the anisotropic properties that come from forging.

    -AJ

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crothcipt View Post
    I wonder if your talking about the Tanaka edge out of the box. Almost all Japanese knives need to be sharpened out of box. I own 2 of his knives and both needed sharpened ootb.
    Yeah, a simple sharpen would be preferable however there blades were warped & over-grinded ootb. 1 blade I hammered close to the edge, it chipped (thus lost 3mm blade height). btw - I was using a hard plastic hammer for chisel.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    ???

    You are hammering the blades? Are you using the blade for a chisel with a plastic hammer?
    Chewie's the man.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajhuff View Post
    Probably not but more so because I think most of the knives that we buy are not forged. Stamped knives (none of which we buy) and cut knives can't pass those tests.

    -AJ
    Sure they can, it's in the heat treating not the forging.

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