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Would your chefs knife pass the ABS Master Smith Test? - Page 3
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Thread: Would your chefs knife pass the ABS Master Smith Test?

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crothcipt View Post
    ???

    You are hammering the blades? Are you using the blade for a chisel with a plastic hammer?
    These blades were very wavy and dented/over-grinded probably worse than Moritaka Dave's thread. So I used a plastic hammer (for whacking a wood working chisel end) to flatten these blades, mostly the bottom half of the blade.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Larrin View Post
    Sure they can, it's in the heat treating not the forging.
    Perhaps I learned it wrong in college, or remember it wrong. It was a long time ago.

    -AJ

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluntcut View Post
    These blades were very wavy and dented/over-grinded probably worse than Moritaka Dave's thread. So I used a plastic hammer (for whacking a wood working chisel end) to flatten these blades, mostly the bottom half of the blade.
    you've got to be very careful when doing things like that. Also, there are easier ways to straighten things out.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    you've got to be very careful when doing things like that. Also, there are easier ways to straighten things out.
    Please straighten my brain out - here or PM, thanks Jon!

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajhuff View Post
    Perhaps I learned it wrong in college, or remember it wrong. It was a long time ago.

    -AJ
    Are you saying that the blades that are stamped are poorly forged, or which part of forging the blades is allowing them to pass the ABS test. Many stock removal blades have passed the test.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Larrin View Post
    Are you saying that the blades that are stamped are poorly forged, or which part of forging the blades is allowing them to pass the ABS test. Many stock removal blades have passed the test.
    Was taught that stampings are not forged nor heat treated. Steels that are stamped are designed to facilitate the stamping process. Was taught that the flow lines induced from forging, the anisotropic properties, allowed a forged blade to bend to 90 degrees and return but a non-forged blade would not. I remember the class because it preceded a visit to Ladish.

    -AJ

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by ajhuff View Post
    Was taught that stampings are not forged nor heat treated. Steels that are stamped are designed to facilitate the stamping process. Was taught that the flow lines induced from forging, the anisotropic properties, allowed a forged blade to bend to 90 degrees and return but a non-forged blade would not. I remember the class because it preceded a visit to Ladish.

    -AJ
    This is interesting to me.What would you consider one of my blades?? They are not stamped,but Carpenter forged the steel into the sheets that I used to make my blades.So is stock removal a forged blade??

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by RRLOVER View Post
    This is interesting to me.What would you consider one of my blades?? They are not stamped,but Carpenter forged the steel into the sheets that I used to make my blades.So is stock removal a forged blade??
    As I understood the class, no. The sheet steel is hot rolled. Not the same as being hammered. Like I said, maybe I'm not remembering all too well, it was a while ago. But Carl Loper was a pretty smart guy. Basically the word of God for metallurgy if he told you something.

    -AJ

  9. #29
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    The grain flow (from carbides and impurities) is not in the direction to cause any problems with bending 90 degrees, unless blades are being stamped in the transverse direction, which is a no-no.

  10. #30
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    I made this handy reference image:


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