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Thread: Need some knife+sharpening suggestions

  1. #1

    Need some knife+sharpening suggestions

    I'm looking to be educated on a good chef knife to buy + how to keep it sharp. I kind of know honing steels, and those sharpening kits, but would love links to really good guides on which ones apply. So many different knife types and sharpening each one is different, so I'm getting totally confused.

    What type of knife(s) do you think you want?

    Chef's knife + relevant equipment for edge maintenence

    Why is it being purchased? What, if anything, are you replacing?

    Need a main knife, have a cheap chef knife right now, but really need a new one for the amount of cooking I do.

    What do you like and dislike about these qualities of your knives already?
    Aesthetics- don't care
    Edge Quality/Retention- Dislike, but I don't think I'm taking care of it correctly
    Ease of Use- Not sure what this means, and how it is different from edge quality or comfort.
    Comfort- don't care

    What grip do you use?

    pinch

    What kind of cutting motion do you use?

    Mostly slice, some chop

    Where do you store them?

    Magnet strip

    Have you ever oiled a handle?

    No

    What kind of cutting board(s) do you use?

    Plastic

    For edge maintenance, do you use a strop, honing rod, pull through/other, or nothing?


    I use a honing steel before and after using, but I have no idea what hardness my knife is( some cheap off brand ), and I don't think it does much.

    Have they ever been sharpened?


    No

    What is your budget?


    $200 for knife + sharpening stuff

    What do you cook and how often?


    At least once daily, uh meat and vegetables? Not sure how specific I need to be here.

    Special requests(Country of origin/type of wood/etc)?

    None

    Thanks for looking!

  2. #2
    http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/products.html

    All available here. Stones also

    Find what you like visually and boom.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Have a simple carbon gyuto to start with. Other, advanced stainless with their specific sharpening problems will follow once you got the basics. If you're right handed, a Fujiwara FKH, Misono Swedish Carbon or Hiromoto AS might be a suggestion.

  4. #4
    Welcome!

    I would agree that a gyuto may be the best place to start. Are you familiar with the neediness of carbon--in other words, do you clean a knife immediately after use, or leave it laying on the cutting board/sink?

    You can find a nice 2 sided stone that will be great for a beginner sharpener for maybe $50-60 which will leave the rest of your budget to a knife--you can find something very nice for this amount of money. Finally, are you in the US?

    Cheers

    I will add a few other sites to peruse:

    http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/
    http://www.japaneseknifesharpeningst...tones-s/22.htm
    one man gathers what another man spills...

  5. #5
    [Depends on where you live] I would say JCK is unbeatable if it comes to postage price and speed.

    You can buy all you need to start right there and save on shipping from two different sources.

    Also Fujiwara, stainless or not, is the cheapest decent starter available?

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by bieniek View Post
    [Depends on where you live] I would say JCK is unbeatable if it comes to postage price and speed.

    You can buy all you need to start right there and save on shipping from two different sources.

    Also Fujiwara, stainless or not, is the cheapest decent starter available?
    there're also the artifex and tojiro ITK from that other site; pretty cheap knives made from very decent steels.

  7. #7
    Only if youre in US, mention that

  8. #8
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    Welcome Sandman!!!
    Chewie's the man.

  9. #9
    Wow awesomely fast responses!

    @bienik: I actually saw that site being referred a lot in other posts, but that site is seriously overwhelming. I'm pretty sure I want a gyuto, but there's a ton of gyutos there (There's a bunch of different craftsman, that have a bunch of different lines, and I really can't tell the difference between them.

    @Benuser: Yep I was thinking the same thing. I am right-handed.

    I'm assuming you're referring to these?
    http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/FKHSeries.html
    http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/Sw...eelSeries.html
    http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/Te...akuSeries.html

    Uh, what's the difference? The description paragraphs all say the same thing about super quality edge or what not. The FKH is half the price as the other 2, is it worth the jump?

    My current knife is 8-inch, but are there any simple tests on what length gyuto is good for you, or is just preference?

    @chinacats: Yep, I take good care of my crappy knife, always wash, hone, and dry right after I finish using it it. I am in the US.

    2-sided stone? The picture guide on that website says you should use 3, but I'm guessing one side is medium and the other side is fine?
    http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/Wh...esForSale.html
    Is the combination stone the kind you are referring to?

  10. #10
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    I would choose a 240mm. You will get used to it within a few days. These blades are thin and light compared to e.g. their German equivalents. The 240 are much more versatile, and are preferred by most pros, which can become relevant if ever you would like to sell it.
    All three are excellent knives.
    Fujiwara: tool steel, not the finest grain, simple but acceptable F&F
    Misono: much finer steel, exceptional F&F
    Both are very reactive, so you will have to force a patina (don't worry, we'll explain)
    Hiromoto: very different animal, carbon core with stainless clad, easy maintenance, just a few milimeters of the core is exposed. Core is made of an exceptionally good steel, takes a crazy edge and holds it almost forever.

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