Quantcast
Suggestions for a Chefs Knife - Page 2
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: Suggestions for a Chefs Knife

  1. #11
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central Jersey
    Posts
    2,964
    Hey, nice to see you could make it to the nut house!! I'm glad you followed me (PCCKitchen) over here. At least I think it was you I referred over here from youtube. Anyway you are in good hands that is unless you like money in your wallet.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  2. #12
    Just a quick question, didn't get a chance to call him today, but I noticed everyone seemed to be steering me towards a Japanese style knife, is there a reason that European styles have sort of gone to the way side, or all of your preferences just Japanese? I know from the little I did research, they're generally sharper and thinner, but can be more brittle and chip if you get the wrong knife. Am I wrong, and anyone that could clear up my original question would be greatly appreciated.

    Also Theory, it was you who recommended me. Thanks a lot, looks like I'll get a great knife when I get around to calling the shop this weekend.

  3. #13
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central Jersey
    Posts
    2,964
    Well the reason most of us here prefer Japanese steel or American craft knives is the hardness and sharpness and edge retention you can achieve on these knives. German steel is just too soft to even bother putting a razor sharp edge on since it will just fold over near immediately. We could also talk about blade profile and geometry too. German stuff is typically thicker heavier and with a much more pronounced sweeping belly towards the tip. This all relates well to a knife made for just crushing through products with a rocking motion. Not at all like Japanese and American blades who's thinness and sharpness effortlessly glides through products with a simple push or pull cut. These are just examples on the western style double beveled blades. Single bevel is a whole nother beast.

    I can comment on your global and shun question as well. Over priced for what they are. Globals aka the official knife of the pretentious douche bag chef: softer steel, hard to learn how to sharpen properly, doesn't even matter if you figure it out anyway because the softer steel just folded over on you again.

    Shun aka the official knife of the know it all expert foodie suzie homemaker catering b1tch. Over marketed poorly heat treated vg-10 steel knives with a great fit and finish. Sure they look good but are they better performers than something almost half the cost like a tojiro dp? Most likely not. Admittedly they do have a few winners here and there mostly with the smaller knives I feel, and they do seem to maybe start listening to what we really want in a knife but it still comes back to bang for the buck for me.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  4. #14
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    wyoming, closer to nowhere than somewhere.
    Posts
    3,501
    If you want a blade that will fall through food it will be thinner, and have a razor sharp blade. If you like the heft of a blade thick blade then you will be pressing and using more energy than what you should.
    Chewie's the man.

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    The Alps, Austria, Europe
    Posts
    411
    good morning,

    it's pretty much the same with me, cooking since i was 12 or 13, got a wuesthof chef's knife from my mom early on, and i always thought this was a good knife. the more you're into cooking techniques and the more you are into cooking material, the more you will start to find out that not everything that you thought was right. my wuesthof is still alive, i still use it, but it has become a knife for the rough duties...

    i have discovered a certain fascination for the esthetics of japanese knifes (both western and traditional handles). my cousin once gave me a yaxell ran santoku as a birthday present. and although i don't like this knife from an ergonomic point of view, it outperformed my beloved wuesthof by far.

    so far so good, but then i found out that this was just another knife, and my fascination grew, and grew, and grew, and still keeps growing!

    anyway, there are fantastic knives out there, some for ridiculous amount of money, some at more reasonable prices. personally, i'd probably go for the ~US$ 200-250 range. you'll find something there that will make you really happy, such as konosuke, hattori, or gesshin. those would be worth looking at! but it is all a question of personal preferences...

    btw, if you're interested in a 210mm hattori fh gyuto, send me a private message. i am selling mine. not because i don't like it, but i recently got myself one of those ridiculously expensive knives in 210mm lenght, so...

    anyway, enjoy searching!

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5
    since our budget, needs, and previous knowledge seem similar, here's my thread asking the same thing

    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...ng-suggestions

  7. #17
    Alright that's what exactly what I needed to know. I'm about to move, so I'm probably not going to spend something crazy on a knife, maybe in the next year or two, but considering I cook all the time, somewhere around 150. Plus if I'm learning to sharpen, don't want to be doing it on a 250 to 300 dollar knife lol. The only thing I wondered, is there a certain brand, other than Shun's and Globals, that you just want to steer clear of? I've been busy all day, trying to finish some yard work so I didn't get a chance to call, but always good to know if there are some knives you just want to stay away from.

    Oh and sandman, didn't see that post until after I posted mine. I'll have to take a look at your thread, probably will have some good information on there from the quick glance that I gave it.

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    The Alps, Austria, Europe
    Posts
    411
    Quote Originally Posted by Trader0692 View Post
    (...) considering I cook all the time, somewhere around 150. Plus if I'm learning to sharpen, don't want to be doing it on a 250 to 300 dollar knife lol.
    understood. but just give it a try and send me a PM if you're interested in the 210mm hattori fh gyuto. at JCK it retails for US$ 227 + shipping. considering i am selling it in used condition, it will probably be close to your desired price range...

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts