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Thread: Are Takedas still worth the price?

  1. #11
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    im referring to #6 chinese cleavers. konosuke makes one actually for $290 that you can get through their vendor. swedish stainless.

  2. #12
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    Ashi white steel #6 is $265 at blueway. 420g, looks to have a very nice taper. Think Keiichi can get customs as well

  3. #13
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    I handled Konosuke white #2 Cleaver #6 at Chef's armoury the other day. It feels quite good in hand, and has decent finish. From appearance, it seems to have core steel all the way up to the spine where you can see three layers of steel there.

    It is, at 480g, a little a bit heavier than sugimoto #6, but seems to be thinner at the spine. The extra weight is probably due to steel in the handle. I still prefer the feeling of sugimoto #6 myself, and now really wonder how #7 would feel in hand.

  4. #14
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    If you have some money to burn,get the Takeda

  5. #15
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    You can't go wrong with a Takeda, but for a chukabocho, there are a lot of options because the geometry won't be all that different (bevel, and then thin and flat all the way up to the spine). You can get the same AS steel in a Moritaka for less cost, but it doesn't have the badass Takeda kurouchi finish. Takeda excels in the gyuto (if you like the wide blade) because there's really nothing out there that has the same geometry as a Takeda gyuto.

    If you're welling to shell out the extra money for the Sugimoto OMS version, then I guess money isn't the issue.. I'm particular to Aogami Super steel because it is still the king of edge retention when it comes to carbon steels, so among those choices I'd pick the Takeda. I'm biased, as I own five Takedas and six Moritakas.

    Even more important is how the cleaver feels when you wield it because I doubt there will be a bad performer in the group.

  6. #16
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    The appeal of Takeda was getting a high performance knife at a low price. The trade off being rough fit and finish. As prices have gone up, it gets harder to justify the issues. If I paid $550 for my Takeda, more then likely I would have sent it back.

    For the money, I'd pick up a Mizuno Swedish steel cleaver and get it re-handled. The cleaver handle design that Fish and Andy came up with, is close to perfect. Andy has continued to refine the design. The last time I talked with Andy, he was really busy, but he might be willing to share some tips on what makes a good cleaver handle.

    Another idea Andy is always working on a project. He sells his old knives to get money for new projects. With his collection you might be able to score a kick ass cleaver.

    Jay

  7. #17
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    i have two of Takeda's gyutos (both nominally 240mm, but both are very different in profile and size and weight) and i adore both. i use them most of the time instead of my Kochi and Shigefusa, both of which (especially the Shig; i need to thin my Kochi out) cut very well. i don't think they are value knives at all, and i think they have good handles and F&F (one has a Keller handle, which is of course great, but the stock handle on the other is very nice), with the parts that need to be rounded being rounded, and the parts that don't need to be rounded being left alone. they cut like the Dickens and feel great doing it. easy sharpening, as well. hard to beat.

  8. #18

    +1 ashi hamono/gesshin ginga

    i own a ashi hamono ginga cleaver special order, full size but 400g only, and have to say it shouldnt be thinner! i often think about that a 450g chuka would be better and if i was to buy another one, id go for 450g. still im very satisfied with it. the white #2 is way easier to sharpen than every other "high end" steel ive tried. after 4 weeks of daily use it had formed a nice natural patina and didnt have any problems with rust since then. id recommend this knife to anybody interested in chukas, and dont think the takeda could do any better other then 2-3 hrc.

  9. #19
    Senior Member JKerr's Avatar
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    Cheers for the input so far everyonbe. Much appreciated.

    I probably should have added a but more info in the OP. The knife won't be used at work, pretty much just for when I'm cooking at home so I was after something that would basically be fun to use (and maybe to look at ). As such, I'm not specifically after a certain type of cleaver (laser, bone-in-meats etc) which is why I was considering the takeda, sugimoto oms and the saji, all of which are pretty damn different. And my preference would be for carbon, though if the right thing comes up I am open; already have one of the N2T mid tech cleavers on order.

    Anyone know if Tadatsuna are still making chuckabocho?

    Cheers,
    Josh

  10. #20
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    Not that it's relevant, butt I would get the Takeda. I love those suckers!
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

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